Posts Tagged ‘Tariff Classification’


 

2017 Designation Maintenance Begins in our Professional Development Courses!

T if for Trade Compliance Education

A new year means a new start for most everything and this includes a reset to the maintenance requirements of your professional designations set forth by the credential’s governing body. We are well into the year now and our Professional Development Courses for fall 2017 are about to launch.

Whether you are a Canadian or U.S. Certified Customs Specialist (CCS), a Certified Trade Compliance Specialist (CTCS), a Certified Export Specialist (CES), a designate with the Law Society of British Columbia (LSBC) or accounting professional, taking any of Pacific Customs Brokers’ seminars and webinars will earn you maintenance points, credits and hours towards a variety professional designations.

Review and plan your maintenance for the second half of 2017 by clicking on the course’s name below:

(Fall registration opens at midnight on July 15, 2017)

  CSCB NEI LSBC
Webinar CCS CTCS CCS CES  
CDN Importing for Beginners Part 1
CDN Importing for Beginners Part 2
US Importing for Beginners Part 1 1
US Importing for Beginners Part 2 1
FDA Regulated Goods 2 2 1
CFIA Regulated Goods 2 2
NAFTA for Beginners Part 1 1 1
NAFTA for Beginners Part 2 1
 
Seminar
Shipping Perishables – NEW! 5 5 3 3
CDN Trade Compliance Part 1 5 5
CDN Trade Compliance Part 2 5 5 3
Exporting from Canada 5 5 3 3
US Trade Compliance Part 1 5 5 3
US Trade Compliance Part 2 5 5 3 3
HS Tariff Classification 5 6 4
Free Trade Agreements and Rules of Origin 5 5 5
Customs Valuation 5 3.5
CFIA 5 5
FDA 5 5 3
CTPAT 3 3 2 2

 

If you have never attended one of our Professional Development Courses before, the following information might help you decide on attending the next one.

Professional Development Courses – Webinars

Our webinars are designed to meet the demands of the global trade community. These live webinars are a convenient way for trade professionals to stay ahead of new regulations with international trade and gain additional knowledge in key areas. The benefits of attending an online course include:

  • Cost-effectiveness – More affordable than industry standards and some even offered complimentary
  • Global accessibility – Travel is removed from the equation for companies with multiple locations or branches
  • Convenience – Attend from the comfort of your desk
  • Concise training – In a fast-paced industry, efficiency becomes just as important as staying compliant
  • Industry recognized sessions – Earn points towards maintenance of your industry designations

Professional Development Courses – Seminars and Workshops

At these in-person sessions, you will learn the best practices on being compliant as an importer and/or exporter helping you expedite your commercial shipments rather than triggering costly delays. Our experts share their knowledge on international and cross-border shipping to keep you current with customs and participating government agency regulations.  The benefits of attending an in-person seminar or workshop include:

  • All day access – Get our experts to answer your questions one-on-one
  • Case studies and real-life examples – Examine other attendees’ trade compliance issues
  • Cost-effectiveness – More affordable than industry standards
  • Range of topics – Choose from a wide variety of seminar topics
  • Certificate of Completion – Receive a certificate for each course you attend
  • Handouts – Take home your own set of course material
  • Industry recognized sessions – Earn points towards maintenance of your industry designations
  • Networking – Connect with other like-minded professionals

For future reference, download your own 2017 Fall Trade Compliance Program today!

The Most Crucial Aspect of Global Trade: HS Tariff Codes

HS Tariff CodesEvery commodity that clears through customs must have an accurate and correct Harmonized System code (HS code) applied to it. This code identifies the item to Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA), as well as indicates the duty rate payable.

The Canada Customs Invoices or Commercial Invoices prepared must provide enough detail to identify the goods and correctly establish the H. S. tariff classification code.

Tariff classification can be very complex and speaks to the essential character of the article being imported:

  • What article is being imported?
  • What is the article made of?
  • What is the item used for?

Almost 200 countries, representing about 98 percent of world trade use the Harmonized System as a basis for trade negotiations collecting international trade statistics, quota controls, rules of origin and for statistical and economic research and analysis.

Anatomy of an HS Code:

The HS code is a 10 digit code. The first six (6) digits of the HS code are universal (meaning that all countries use the same first six digits to classify a commodity); the remaining four (4) digits that make up the HS Code are unique from country to country and used for statistics.

Classifying commodities correctly is key with regards to the importer paying the correct amount of duty and avoiding Administrative Monetary Penalty System (AMPS) penalties, or worse, seizure of your goods.

The Customs Tariff book is a comprehensive list of all HS codes laid out in 99 chapters; the progression being from raw products to the most highly processed. These 99 chapters are also broken into 21 sections for ease of reference. The tariff book contains over 10,000 detailed tariff options. In order to select the correct tariff code, you or your customs broker are required to understand the rules contained in the tariff book, and have detailed knowledge of the item(s) being imported.

All imported items must be classified in the Harmonized Tariff System (HTS) using the General Rules of Interpretation and other aids.

 Commodities entering Canada are classified based on:

  1. Six (6) Universal General Interpretive Rules (GIR) and
  2. Three (3) Canadian Rules

 The Six Universal General Interpretive Rules (GIR):

Rule No.1:

The titles of Sections, Chapters and Sub-Chapters are provided for ease of reference only; for legal purposes, classification shall be determined according to the terms of the headings and any relative Section or Chapter Notes and, provided such headings or notes do not otherwise require, according to the following provisions.

Rule No.2:

2. (a) Any reference in a heading to an article shall be taken to include a reference to that article incomplete or unfinished, provided that, as presented, the incomplete or unfinished article has the essential character of the complete or finished article. It shall also be taken to include a reference to that article complete or finished (or falling to be classified as complete or finished by virtue of this Rule), presented unassembled or disassembled.

2. (b) Any reference in a heading to a material or substance shall be taken to include a reference to mixtures or combinations of that material or substance with other materials or substances. Any reference to goods of a given material or substance shall be taken to include a reference to goods consisting wholly or partly of such material or substance. The classification of goods consisting of more than one material or substance shall be according to the principles of Rule 3.

Rule No. 3:

3. When by application of Rule 2 (b) or for any other reason, goods are, prima facie, classifiable under two or more headings, classification shall be effected as follows:

3 (a) The heading which provides the most specific description shall be preferred to headings providing a more general description. However, when two or more headings each refer to part only of the materials or substances contained in mixed or composite goods or to part only of the items in a set put up for retail sale, those headings are to be regarded as equally specific in relation to those goods, even if one of them gives a more complete or precise description of the goods.

3 (b) Mixtures, composite goods consisting of different materials or made up of different components, and goods put up in sets for retail sale, which cannot be classified by reference to Rule 3 (a), shall be classified as if they consisted of the material or component which gives them their essential character, insofar as this criterion is applicable.

3 (c) When goods cannot be classified by reference to Rule 3 (a) or 3 (b), they shall be classified under the heading which occurs last in numerical order among those which equally merit consideration.

Rule No. 4:

Goods which cannot be classified in accordance with the above Rules shall be classified under the heading appropriate to the goods to which they are most akin.

Rule No. 5:

5. In addition to the foregoing provisions, the following Rules shall apply in respect of the goods referred to therein:

5(a) Camera cases, musical instrument cases, gun cases, drawing instrument cases, necklace cases and similar containers, specially shaped or fitted to contain a specific article or set of articles, suitable for long-term use and presented with the articles for which they are intended, shall be classified with such articles when of a kind normally sold therewith. This Rule does not, however, apply to containers which give the whole its essential character.

5(b) Subject to the provisions of Rule 5 (a) above, packing materials and packing containers presented with the goods therein shall be classified with the goods if they are of a kind normally used for packing such goods. However, this provision is not binding when such packing materials or packing containers are clearly suitable for repetitive use.

Rule No.6:

6. For legal purposes, the classification of goods in the subheadings of a heading shall be determined according to the terms of those subheadings and any related Subheading Notes and, mutatis mutandis, to the above Rules, on the understanding that only subheadings at the same level are comparable. For the purpose of this Rule the relative Section and Chapter Notes also apply, unless the context otherwise requires.

The Three Canadian Rules:

1. For legal purposes, the classification of goods in the tariff items of a subheading or of a heading shall be determined according to the terms of those tariff items and any related Supplementary Notes and, mutatis mutandis, to the General Rules for the Interpretation of the Harmonized System, on the understanding that only tariff items at the same level are comparable. For the purpose of this Rule the relative Section, Chapter and Subheading Notes also apply, unless the context otherwise requires.

2. Where both a Canadian term and an international term are presented in this Nomenclature, the commonly accepted meaning and scope of the international term shall take precedence.

3. For the purpose of Rule 5 (b) of the General Rules for the Interpretation of the Harmonized System, packing materials or packing containers clearly suitable for repetitive use shall be classified under their respective headings.

 

Correctly understanding and interpreting the General Interpretive Rules (GIR), and using them to apply the most accurate HS code, is the basis of tariff classification. A customs broker has years of practice using the GIR to apply true and accurate HS codes chosen from the 99 Chapters of the Customs Tariff book.

 

The Explanatory Notes

In addition to the GIRs contained in the Customs Tariff, a second publication, the Explanatory Notes, is used to assist in correctly classifying commodities. The Explanatory Notes is a list of definitions, explanations and rules that apply to and clarify headings and subheadings in the Customs Tariff.

As well as identifying the commodity and duty rate to CBSA, the HS code also indicates if the product requires additional clearances from other government agencies such as the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) or Natural Resource Canada (NRCan).

 

Advanced Ruling

In the event that there is no obvious classification that fits the item being imported, an Advanced Ruling should be requested. An advanced ruling ensures that the item will be classified to CBSA’s satisfaction and there will be no penalty for misclassified items. This is recommended for any item that is not clearly stated in the Customs Tariff or appears to have more than one equally applicable tariff.

Should you get an advanced tariff classification ruling from CBSA?

Not all goods require an advanced ruling from customs in order to be properly classified, however the process remains complex and all imported items must be classified in the Harmonized Tariff System (HTS) using the General Rules of Interpretation and other aids. Getting an advance ruling ensures that the tariff classification number used is deemed correct by the CBSA. The advance ruling provides certainty to the importer, or his or her representative, as to how goods are to be classified and thereby facilitates the documentation and other governmental department requirements for clearing goods at the border.

 

Proper classification is the starting point of compliance. A thorough knowledge of the Harmonized System is essential for anyone involved in global trade. If you would like to further your understanding of tariff classification and find the correct commodity codes for your goods, attend our upcoming H.S. Tariff Classification Workshop. In this hands-on session you will learn how to classifying goods and parts , understand the complexities of the various rules of interpretations of the H.S. Tariff System, gain a better understanding of how duties are determined and learn about preferential tariff treatments. Register today!

 

Have questions or comments on H.S. tariff classification? Post your thoughts in the comments section below or email us at Ask Your Broker.

Are you Prepared If Selected For a Customs Audit?

Performing Customs AuditWhether your business is exporting or importing goods as a resident or Non-Resident Importer, you should be aware that at some point you are likely to be selected for an audit. The majority of Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) audits cover tariff classification, duty assessments, verification of origin, and NAFTA. Some audits are random verifications where an importer is randomly chosen to undergo an audit. The other audit practice employed by CBSA is through verification priorities where they target specific industries or products. In both situations, they are auditing to ensure importers are compliant and observing all rules and regulations. Out of the major areas audited, the one most commonly overlooked by importers is the subject of valuation.

What is valuation?

As it relates to imported goods, valuation means determining the correct value to declare to Customs. This is also known as the value for duty.

The most common valuation method used is transaction value, however the final value for duty could be influenced by:

  • The relation between the parties involved (i.e. a related buyer and seller)
  • Conditions where the goods were not purchased by the Canadian recipient (i.e. consignment)
  • Allowable deductions to the price paid
  • Additions or other costs which must be added to the price before Customs duty and taxes are calculated
  • Used goods
  • Goods sold while in Canada on a temporary basis

Why should you be concerned?

Primarily as this is an area reviewed and regulated by CBSA. Importers generally spend the least amount of time worrying about valuation, but it is still an area where you are expected to be compliant. As an example, a recent CBSA bulletin indicated that Customs has determined the following are current verification priorities targeted on imports of: fresh cut flowers, apparel, footwear, yachts for pleasure or sport, and preparations & pastry cook products.

Secondly, there are 40 sections of the Department of National Revenue (Customs & Excise) memoranda that deal with valuation. It can be an intricate area to navigate if your foreign purchases involve situations which could change the declared value to Canada Customs.

While this subject is extensive, let’s review a couple of the key valuation topics that may have been easily overlooked when making customs declarations.

Assists

An “assist” is defined as goods or services provided free or at a reduced charge by the purchaser for use in the production of imported goods.

  • Materials, components, parts and other goods incorporated in imported goods.
  • Tools, dies, moulds, and other goods utilized in the production of imported goods.
  • Any materials consumed in the production of imported goods.
  • Engineering, development work, art work, design work, plans and sketches undertaken elsewhere than in Canada and necessary for the production of imported goods.

For example, if a Canadian purchaser contracted a U.S. company to bottle juice where the Canadian company provided the packaging materials, the additional costs of the packaging would need to be included in the declared value of the juice.

Parties involved in a transaction

Many transactions involve two parties – a buyer and a seller, which usually makes it is easy to determine the value for duty. However sometimes there are numerous parties: manufacturers, exporters, distributors, buying and selling agents, vendors, consignees and purchasers. The involvement of many parties could make it difficult to identify the correct value for duty and additional care should be exercised.

In many cases, the results of assigning correct values are “revenue neutral” with CBSA; in other words, the goods may be duty free which means that the importer will not incur additional expenses. Like all importations however, the onus is still on the importer to make accurate Customs’ declarations or potentially expose themselves to fines and penalties under the Administrative Monetary Penalty System (AMPS).

If you have reason to believe that you have valuation situations which have the potential to raise flags during an audit, please give us a call to discuss this further.

To learn more and gain insight on what CBSA is assessing consider attending  an upcoming  Canada Customs Audit Seminar. If you are importing and exporting goods into the United States, it might interest you to attend the U.S. Customs Audit Seminar.
 
Do you have questions around a Customs audit? Ask them in our comments section below.