Posts Tagged ‘SWI’


 

Single Window Initiative Requires Additional Data For Your IID

Single Window Initiative

You have read What Is The Single Window Initiative (SWI) and learned how additional data will be required on Integrated Import Declarations (IID) for Customs release on all commodities regulated by Participating Government Agencies.

You will now need to include data elements in your IID that may have been previously reported after importation, or in paper format, and will become mandatory in January 2019.

This means you will need to provide more information to your Customs Brokers than you have in the past for all commodities regulated by Participating Government Agencies (PGA) such as Health Canada, and Environment and Climate Change Canada.

Is your commodity subject to Participating Government Agencies?

You can find out from our helpful What Does My Commodity Need? infographic.

What Regulated Commodities Will Be Affected By Single Window Initiative?

If your commodity is regulated by a Participating Government Agency you will be impacted by a Integrated Import Declarations. However, for some commodities the details have already been required for many years.

For example, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) requires all importers with commodities regulated by the CFIA to provide shipment details prior to entry releases. As a result, for goods regulated by the CFIA, you may not have to provide any additional data to your Customs Broker in order to clear these entries.

Cases where they would need information that they did not before IID’s include consignee contact information as well as requiring copies of documents such as import declarations. In cases where the consignee is different than the importers or manufacturers, you will need to include the consignee contact information in box 12 of your CCI.

All Participating Government Agencies, including the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, will prompt your Customs Broker to ensure the documentation you provide includes all of the data required for the IID.

The Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) has provided a guideline indicating what data is required for each Participating Government Agency which you can check out in the links below. Please note that the information in these links is subject to change and is correct at the time of publishing.

Where Do I Report The Additional Data Elements On My Canada Customs Invoice?

If the products you import into Canada are regulated by any of these Participating Government Agencies, you will be required to add all of the data elements listed in the links above to your commercial or Canada Customs Invoice. Below are a few examples you can follow along to see how you can report the additional data elements.

Example 1: Consumer Product Safety, Regulated by Health Canada

Below is a summary of the additional data elements required for consumer Products regulated by Health Canada. Please note that although many of these elements are noted as optional, and only two as mandatory, you are recommended to include all elements in preparation of when/if the optional elements become mandatory, as well as to help Health Canada make a release decision.

  • Importer’s Contact Information: This includes a contact name at the Importer of Record company, telephone number and email address. In most cases, your Customs Broker will have this information as it will be their contact for your company on file. Therefore the information will be included on the IID and there would be no need for you to provide this on the CCI.
  • Manufacturer Contact Information: The manufacturer’s name, address, contact name, email and telephone will be required in box 12 of the CCI. If this is the same as the vendor, you can add it to box 1 as shown in the example.
  • License, Permit, Certificate or Other (LPCO) Information: If your consumer goods require a license, permit, certificate or other type of document such as a safety standard certification or product label, in order to enter the country, you need to make this available to your Customs Broker. Your Customs Broker will attach the LPCO as an image file in the IID. If it is not a document, but rather a number, please place it in box 12 on the CCI along with an indication of what number it is.
  • Item Specific Information: This information provides the individual details of the imported items which are to be included in box 12 of the CCI which includes:
    • Global Trade Identification Number (GTIN): This 14 digit number is used to identify products and services through a barcode. This is usually the UPC number.
    • Brand Name
    • Product Name
    • Manufacture Date
    • Batch/Lot Number
    • Unit Size and Unit of Measure
    • Intended End Use: Identify how the items will be used from one of the following options: Sale or distribution, education, resale, charitable, repair, immediate re-exportation.
    • Commodity Type: A Product Category must be listed. The category listed is dependant on the intended end use. Use the table below to identify the wording that should be listed in box 12.

Intended use

Product Category

For Sale of Distribution

Consumer product for infants (0-18 months)

Consumer product for infants (19 – 36 months)

Consumer product for infants (3-6 years)

Consumer product for infants (6-8 years)

Consumer product for infants (8-12 years)

Consumer product for infants (13+ years)

Consumer product for infants (all ages)

Consumer chemical

Cosmetic

Educational, resale, charitable, repair or immediate re-exportation

Consumer product (for all ages)


Using the information provided above for consumer products, and applying the example of stuffed toy animals, the Customs Invoice will require the additional data highlighted in the sample below.

Single Window Initiative - Consumer Goods

 

Example 2: Natural Health Products, Regulated by Health Canada

Below is a summary of the additional data elements required for natural health products regulated by Health Canada.

  • Importer’s Contact Information: This includes a contact name from the Importer of Record company, telephone number and email address. In most cases, your Customs Broker will have this information as it will be their contact for your company on file. Therefore your broker will include your information on the IID and there would be no need for you to provide this on the CCI.
  • Informational Contact: This is someone who has knowledge of the items being imported in the case that Health Canada would like further information about the product. Name, telephone number and emails address is required. If this is the same as the vendor or consignee, then you can place this information in those boxes. However, if it is different, place this information in Box 12.
  • License, Permit, Certificate or Other (LPCO) Information: If your consumer goods require a license, permit, certificate or other type of document in order to enter the country, you need to make this available to your Customs Broker. They will attach it as a image file in the IID. If it is not a document, but rather a number, please place it in box 12 on the CCI along with an indication of what number it is. See the table below for more information.
  • Item Specific Information: This provides details of the imported items included in Box 12 of the CCI;
    • Global Trade Identification Number (GTIN): A 14 digit number used to identify products and services through a barcode. This is usually the UPC number.
    • Brand Name: If there is no brand name available, a product name, active ingredient or chemical name of the commodity must be provided by the manufacturer.
    • Product Name
    • Manufacture Date
    • Batch/Lot Number
    • Intended End Use: Identify how the items will be used from one of the following options: Human therapeutic use, human clinical trial, special access, research and development, other.
    • Commodity Type: A Product Category must be listed. The category listed is dependant on the intended end use. Use the table below to identify the wording that should be listed.

Intended End Use

Documents Required (LPCO)

Human Therapeutic Use

  1. Site License – 5022
  2. Natural Product Authorization 023 or Homeopathic Medicine Drug Identification 5024

Human Clinical Trial

NHP Notice of Authorization (NOA) 5023

Special Access

Letter of Authorization (LOA) 5045

Research and Development

No Documents Required

Other

No Documents Required


Using the information provided above for Natural Health Products, and applying the example of green tea extract, the Customs Invoice will require the additional data highlighted in the sample below.

Single Window Initiative - Natural Health Products

Example 3: Vehicles and Engines, Regulated by Environment and Climate Change Canada and Transport Canada

Below is a summary of the additional data elements required for on-road vehicles, engines and equipment regulated by Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) and Transport Canada (TC). Please note there are two Participating Agencies involved in the importation of vehicles and engines.

**To understanding the info required by each PGA the data elements required from ECCC are in blue and Transport Canada are in red. All text appearing in black indicates that both of these agencies require this information.**

  • Importer’s Contact Information: This includes a contact name at Importer of Record company, telephone number and email address. In most cases, your Customs Broker will have this information as it will be their contact for your company on file. Therefore they will include that information on the IID and there would be no need for you to provide this on the CCI.
  • Informational Contact: This is someone who has knowledge of the items being imported in the case that ECCC would like further information about the vehicle or engine. Name, telephone number and emails address is required. If this is the same as the vendor or consignee, then you can place this information in those boxes. However if it is different, place this information in Box 12.

Exceptional Processing: The Transport Canada status of the of the vehicle/importer will establish all of the additional data elements required and must be provided or identified on the invoice using one of the following options:

  • Appendix F Pre-Cleared Importer (indicated on the invoice)
  • Appendix G Pre-Cleared Importer (indicated on the invoice)
  • Transport Canada Approved case-by-case approval for New, Canadian-specification vehicle purchased from foreign manufacturer with CMVSS approval letter
  • Transport Canada Approved case-by-case approval letter to accompany the documents for
    • New – Canadian-specification vehicles purchased from foreign manufacturer
    • New – Vehicles manufactured to the Federal Motor Vehicle Standards and purchased from foreign manufacturer
  •  Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards manufactured vehicle requiring inspection by the Registrar of Imported Vehicles (Indicated on the invoice)
  • Vehicles greater than 15 years old, except buses
  • Canadian-specification vehicles returning to the original owner
  • Vehicles Imported for parts
  • Non Regulated Vehicles: please visit Transport Canada’s site on no-regulated vehicles for more information

 

  • Make of Vehicle
  • Make of Engine
  • Model of Vehicle
  • Model of Engine
  • Model Year of Vehicle
  • Model Year of Engine
  • Engine Manufacturer Name
  • Vehicle Identification Number (VIN): 17 digit number
  • Engine Identification Number
  • Name of Engine Family
  • Chassis Info: If the chassis is manufactured by someone other than the final stage assembler, the following details are required:
    • Manufacturer name and address
    • Make
    • Model
    • Year
  • Vehicle Production: Date, Month & Year
  • ECCC Vehicle Class:  The type of vehicle class must be identified using the options listed in the table below.
  • TC Vehicle Class: The type of vehicle class must be identified using the naming convention listed in the table below.

ECCC Vehicle Class

TC Vehicle Class

Light-Duty Vehicles

Light-Duty Vehicles

Light-Duty Trucks

Light-Duty Trucks

Medium-Duty Passenger Vehicles

Medium-Duty Passenger Vehicles

On-Road Motorcycles

On-Road Motorcycles

Heavy-Duty Class 2B Vehicles with Installed Engine

Heavy-Duty Class 2B Vehicles w/inst

Heavy-Duty Class 3B Vehicles with Installed Engine

Heavy-Duty Class 3B Vehicles w/ins

Heavy-Duty Vocational Vehicles with Installed Engine

Heavy-Duty Vocational Vehicles w/in

Heavy-Duty Tractors with Installed Engine

Heavy-Duty Tractors w/installed eng

Incomplete Vehicles

Incomplete Vehicles

 

Vessels with installed marine engine

 

Vessels without marine engines

 

Snowmobiles

 

All-terrain vehicles

 

Utility vehicles

 

Off-road motorcycles

 

Incomplete Vehicles


  • Engine Class: The type of engine class must be identified as either On Road Heavy-Duty Engine – Incomplete or On Road Heavy-Duty Engine – Loose
  • Vehicle Manufacturer: Name and address
  • Criteria Conformance: Advise that the compliance label is attached or provide a letter from the manufacturer that it is in compliance.
  • Final Stage Assembler: If different than chassis manufacturer or vehicle manufacturer: Name and address
  • TC Affirmation Statement of Compliance: This statement is made by the importer and confirms that the vehicle meets all import requirements of Transport Canada.

Please contact your Customs Broker for the specific information that needs to be listed in this statement.

  • ECCC Affirmation of Statement Compliance: This statement is made by the importer and confirms that the vehicle meets all import requirements of Environment and Climate Change Canada (additional date and form will be required by Transport Canada).

Please contact your Customs Broker for the specific information that needs to be listed in this statement.

  • Country of registration (If previously registered)
  • Mileage/Odometer Reading (if used)
  • Title Status (if used)
  • Vehicle Status (if for parts)
  • Vehicle Condition: Normal Damage or Severe Damage (Not Roadworthy)

Using the information provided above for Natural Health Products, and applying the example of a Ford F150 Truck, the Customs Invoice will require the the additional data highlighted in this example.

Single Window Initiative - Vehicles

These examples highlight some of the data elements that were not necessarily included on your invoice prior to the Single Window Initiative, but will be mandatory starting April 2019.

You will need to provide all of the required data elements for your Customs Broker to be able to process your shipment release request. Additional charges may be applied to your Customs brokerage services if this information is not provided on the documentation.

When Should I Start Including The Required Data On My IID?

You should begin incorporating this information into your invoices now, then your shipments are not delayed at the border once IIDs become mandatory.

Need help understanding what Participating Government Agency regulates your commodity? You can contact us and speak with an expert Trade Advisor today.

How will you be affected by the Single Window Initiative? Tell us in the comments below.

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What Is The Single Window Initiative?

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How the SWI and the decommissioning of the current OGD release options will affect importers into Canada

{This post was updated September 8, 2017}

 

In March 2017 the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) implemented the Single Window Initiative (SWI). If your business imports goods into Canada regulated by particular Other Government Departments (OGD’s), the amount of information you are accustomed to reporting to Customs via a declaration may increase.

What do we mean by this? The first step in understanding the effect the SWI will have on your company is understanding what it is.

What is the Single Window Initiative?

The Single Window Initiative is a single point for advance reporting of import information to CBSA. The key phrases here are ‘single point’ and ‘advanced’ which speaks to the method and timing of reporting:

  • Method: ‘Single point’ means that Customs AND all Other Government Departments (OGD’s) collect the required import information in a single declaration (i.e., single window).
  • Timing: The ‘advanced reporting’ side of the equation means information previously provided to OGD’s after (in some cases) the goods are imported into Canada will now be required before the carrier’s arrival at the border.

The purpose of SWI is to provide the trade community with the ability to electronically submit all information required to comply with government import regulations at once. The purpose of this is:

  • Eliminate duplicate and redundant data requirements and processes
  • Reduce the paper burden on the business community and government
  • Align to the greatest extent possible with the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (U.S. CBP)  and the World Customs Organization (WCO)  data model

It is a direct response to calls from the business community to simplify the process at the border and integrate government requirements into one process.

Understanding why the Single Window Initiative is necessary is easily explained with the importance of having OGD’s involved in the import process.

What Role does an Other Government Department Play in Importing Goods?

It is a common misnomer that CBSA is the only party that plays a role in allowing imports into Canada. In fact, many Other Government Departments protect the safety, economy, and environment of Canadians, who also have a say whether goods can be imported or not.

For example, reducing the risk of introducing an invasive species is helped by the reporting regulations and inspection procedures of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA). The CFIA impedes the light brown apple moth, which could hide in many imported fruits and vegetables, from taking up residence in Canada. It has no natural predators in Canada and is very difficult to eradicate. The negative impact that it would have to many of Canada’s economically important exports is considered to be significant.

In addition to the CFIA, there are many OGD`s. The agencies expected to participate in SWI, will be called Participating Government Agencies, and they are as follows:

  • Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)
  • Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission
  • Environment and Climate Change Canada
  • Fisheries and Oceans Canada
  • Global Affairs Canada
  • Health Canada
  • Natural Resources Canada
  • Public Health Agency of Canada
  • Transport Canada

As proven in the CFIA example above, certain imports require another level of scrutiny and therefore reporting. SWI will improve this reporting process.

Reporting Process before SWI

Before the implementation of the Single Window Initiative, declarations prepared by your company, or by a customs broker on your business’s behalf, contain information such as:

  • Vendor

  • Importer
  • Commodities
  • Country of Manufacture
  • Quantity and weight
  • Value
  • Condition of sale
  • Currency of settlement
  • Reference number

For a full list of what is required for commercial imports into Canada, download this checklist.

 

 

CBSA shares the information they receive on the import with regulating OGD’s. However, not all information required by the OGD is listed in the declaration. If the OGD needed further details on the import, in most cases, they would contact the importer of record directly.

To make a border related decision before import, shipment information required by the Other Government Department such as licenses, permits, and certificates would need to be validated. Enter the SWI and the Integrated Import Declaration.

Reporting Process With SWI

Although technically there is no additional information needed by the Participating Government Agency, it will feel like you need to provide far more detail than ever before. This is because CBSA will require this information to be reported on an Integrated Import Declaration (IID) at the time of import.

What is the Integrated Import Declaration?

Since the SWI is a single window in which to collect information on the import for both CBSA and PGA’s, you will need to provide all the information required by those parties, in a single report. That report will be a new robust Customs declaration called the Integrated Customs Declaration (IID). The Integrated Import Declaration has many more data fields than the current declaration. These additional fields capture information on the imported goods that the regulating PGA needs to know.

In April of 2018, the option to report goods regulated by Other Government Departments via the release service options 463 (OGD PARS) and 471 (OGD RMD) will be decommissioned and replaced with an Integrated Import Declaration (IID).

IID Reporting Direct to Customs

If you submit your declarations to CBSA directly through EDI, you will need to include all information required by the PGA, for certain commodities, in addition to the current reporting requirements for CBSA.

IID Reporting via a Customs Broker

As mentioned previously, although technically there is no additional information needed by the Participating Government Agency, it will feel like you need to provide far more detail than ever before because of the requirements to report on an IID at the time of import.

As a result, if you are using a customs broker, you will need to provide more information to them than you ever have had to previously since the IID needs to include all information required by the regulating PGA, if applicable.

PGA Release Changes

After submitting the new and robust Integrated Import Declaration, CBSA will transmit that information to the appropriate department or agency responsible for regulating the goods if applicable. In some cases, the sharing of this information will happen before release and in others, after release.

If your PGA receives the information before release, it will assess the information provided and submit a border related decision to CBSA as required. Only when this PGA has deemed the goods eligible for import, will they be released in Canada.

To simplify, if your products are regulated by any PGA’s, CBSA will review the data provided in the IID in the following steps:

  1. Identify the regulating PGA for the commodity as reported in the IID
  2. Validate the IID data fields against the mandatory, conditional or optional data of that regulating PGA
  3. Trigger the sharing of data with the applicable PGA
  4. A release decision is made and shared with the carrier

Next Steps

You are experienced with the information requirements of Participating Government Agencies on all of your imports which is a great asset during this change. Ensure that you share your PGA regulated goods data elements with your customs broker before implementation.

If you are a client of Pacific Customs Brokers, we will be contacting you in the coming months with the specific additional data requirements we need to clear your imports with the IID.

Many Importers who report to CBSA directly through Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) are preparing with certification and testing by signing up with CBSA and their Technical Commercial Client Unit.

 

For more information on the SWI clients can contact the Single Window Initiative Team at [email protected]

See CBSA Customs Notice 16-22 for an update on what programs within the PGAs are available with SWI and IID.

We will continue to provide updates and clarification on this new modernization initiative in coming updates.