Posts Tagged ‘food safety’


 

Safe Food For Canadians Regulations To Require License For Businesses

 

Safe Food for Canadians Regulations


Safe Food For Canadians Regulations (SFCR)

If you have a business providing food to Canadians, you will most likely be affected by the new SFCR being implemented January 15, 2019. The SFCR focus is to prevent unsafe foods from entering into Canadian marketplaces, as well as, providing faster means to eliminate unsafe foods when they manage to penetrate the marketplace.

How Will SFCR Affect Food Businesses?

Starting January 15, 2019, if you provide food to Canadians, and the food crosses provincial or territorial borders, you will be required to have a license under the SFCR.

The SFCR will also require you to have preventative controls, traceable goods, packaging requirements, and labeling standards to make sure your food is safe for Canadians.

As a food business, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) has a helpful tool to inform you;

  1. If you need a license,
  2. When you will need the license by, and
  3. How to apply for the license.

What Food Business Activities Will Require A SFCR License?

For more information on if you need a license, the CFIA has also produced a well structured guide “Food business activities that require a license under the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations”. This guide is helpful for the DIY (Do It Yourself) approach. It covers who will need a license and who will not. For instance, if you are going on a road trip across Canada and you have a few snacks, you will not need a license. However, if you are importing food into Canada, you will need a license if you are importing food additives, alcoholic beverages, and for all unprocessed foods listed in Schedule 1 of the SFCR.

An Expert Trade Advisor You Can Rely On

For those who do not want to study the requirements top to bottom, a customs broker or trade advisor will be able to help you navigate the new regulations of the SFCR beginning early 2019. You can contact one of our expert trade advisors today to help you simplify the complicated world of trade.

 

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Biennial FDA Food Facility Re-registration Now Open

FoodAbout the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) program:

The Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) improves the registration process by ensuring, among other things, that the FDA has accurate contact information for each facility. The new registration form also includes new categories of foods. These new categories will help FDA rapidly communicate with the right facilities in the event of an emergency. Food producers and manufacturers have long been required to register with the Food and Drug Administration. Facilities can register online, via mail or fax. If your company is not domestic (not located within the U.S.) you will be required to assign a U.S. agent in your registration. See below for more information on assigning a U.S. agent.

 

Read more in our blog: Food Modernization Safety Act – Re-Registering your Facility with the FDA

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued further information and guidance regarding registration requirements for domestic and foreign manufacturers, processors, packers or holders of food for human or animal consumption based on changes made by the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) to the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FD&C Act). Biennial registration renewal for food facilities began at 12:01 AM on October 1, 2014. The updated food facility registration system is accepting food facility registration renewals.

Who must register?

Under the Food Safety Modernization Act (FMSA), all domestic and foreign facilities that manufacture, pack or store food, food ingredients, pet foods or dietary supplements are required to renew their registration with the FDA before the end of 2014 and to re-register every two years thereafter. This represents a change from the previous registration requirement for food facilities. The re-registration form contains new food categories, and requires more detailed and updated contact information.

 Read more in our blog: U.S. Food Safety Modernization Act – Does It Affect Me?

How to re-register a domestic company?

To submit a registration renewal to FDA, a food facility is required to submit required registration information to FDA, including the additional registration information. If you are affected by the new regulations, you may re-register your food facility online.

How to re-register if not a domestic company?

Pacific Customs Brokers offers the following services:

  • Act as your U.S. Agent
  • Assist with FSMA re-registration
  • Answer your queries regarding FDA requirements

Note: Pacific Customs Brokers does not have to be your U.S. customs broker in order to assist your company with FSMA re-registration.   Contact Pacific Customs Brokers for assistance with food facility registrations or the FSMA. To stay current on this topic, you may also want to subscribe to Pacific Customs Brokers weekly trade newsletter.   Do you have questions on the FDA food facility re-registration? Share them in our comments section below.

FDA Releases Updates to FSMA Proposals

Food Safety StampThe Food and Drug Administration (FDA) proposed a number of new rules during 2013 which have been in various stages of “public comment” for some time. The FDA has recently announced updated proposals to four of the seven rules, based on feedback received from the public.

Four Food Safety Modernization Act Rule Revisions

These four updated proposed rules include:

  1. Produce Safety – More flexible criteria for determining the safety of agricultural water for certain uses and a tiered approach to water testing. A commitment to conduct extensive research on the safe use of raw manure in growing areas and complete a risk assessment.
  2. Preventive Controls for Human Food – Requirements that human food facilities, when appropriate, test products and the food facility’s environment, as well as implement certain supplier controls.
  3. Preventive Controls for Animal Food – Requirements that animal food facilities, when appropriate, test products and the food facility’s environment, as well as implement certain supplier controls.
  4. Foreign Supplier Verification Program – A more comprehensive analysis of potential risks associated with foods and foreign suppliers, and more flexibility for importers in determining appropriate supplier verification measures based on their evaluation of those risk

Modifications to Originally Proposed Rules

Some of the modifications to the originally proposed rules include:

  • Revisions to the water quality testing provisions to account for natural variations in water sources and to adjust its approach to manure and compost used in crop production pending further research.
  • Revised definition of which farms would be subject to the produce safety rule, eliminating farms with $25,000 or less in produce sales from being subject to this rule.
  • Spent grains, which are byproducts of alcohol brewing or distilling, commonly used as animal feed,would not be subject to both the animal food rule if the facility already complies with the human food rule.
  • Extended flexibility to determine appropriate supplier verification measures based on risk and previous experience with suppliers.

Commenting on Proposed Regulations

The FDA states that they will accept comments on the proposed revisions for 75 days, and will continue to review previously submitted comments on parts of the rules that will remain the same in their final iterations.  Final rules are now scheduled to be issued in 2014, and will become final within 90 days of issuance.

We should bear in mind that there are still other proposed rules within the FMSA that are in different stages of completion. These are just four of those issues that we believe are of primary importance to importers and exporters who need to ensure all parties within your supply chain are complying with these rules that are now expected to be in place during 2015.

As food and beverage producers adapt to an array of stringent food safety requirements in the coming year, Pacific Customs Brokers is here to help. We can assist you in understanding these regulations and how they may affect your business, all while cutting through the red tape of importing to the United States.

 

Do you have questions about these updates to FSMA proposals? Use the comments section below to offer your thoughts or email Ask Your Broker.

 

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New Food Safety Regulations That Will Dominate 2014

Stamp: Safe FoodThe Food and Drug Administration (FDA) proposed a number of new rules during 2013.  Some of these are in the “public comment” period at this time, with conclusions happening during the first and second quarters of 2014.  From there, the FDA will submit final language to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and publication in the Federal Register, and these are expected to become final within 90 days of issuance.

While there are many proposed rules, guidance documents and reports that are part of the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA), we list here a few of the primary issues that we believe importers and exporters need to ensure all parties within your supply chain are complying with, rules expected to be in place or in play during 2014.

  1. Sanitary transportation rule for both human and animal food – This will affect shippers, carriers, receivers and other parties involved in food transportation.

Learn more: Sanitation and Transportation Guidance Documents and Regulatory Information

  1. Written food safety plan, which incorporates proof that you are following the plan, to include hazards analysis, preventive controls, monitoring, corrective actions, verifications and record-keeping.

Learn more: FSMA Proposed Rule for Preventive Controls for Human Food

  1. Foreign supplier verification program – Importers will be required to have a program to verify that the food products they are importing are safe, which includes verifying that their suppliers are in compliance with reasonably appropriate risk-based preventive controls.

Learn more: FDA Food Safety Modernization Act – General Information on Imports

As food and beverage producers adapt to an array of stringent food safety requirements in the coming year, Pacific Customs Brokers is here to help. We can assist you in understanding these regulations and how they may affect your business, all while cutting through the red tape of importing to the United States. Take advantage of our upcoming webinar on Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Regulated Goods on May 8, 2014 and refresh your knowledge in the importation of FDA regulated goods.

Do you have questions about these FSMA regulations? Use the comments section below to leave us your thoughts or email Ask Your Broker.

 

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U.S. Food Safety Modernization Act – Does It Affect Me?

{This blog post was last updated September 26, 2016}

If you manufacture, process, pack, transport, distribute, receive, hold, export or import food, or food components for human or animal consumption in the USA, you will be affected by these new regulations.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention states that about 48 million people (1 in 6 Americans) get sick; 128,000 are hospitalized; and 3,000 die each year from food-borne diseases, most of which are preventable.  The Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) of 2010 is the most sweeping food safety legislation in 70 years, and will require almost all food related companies doing business with or in the USA to meet stringent new safety standards.  This legislation affects all food related companies, both domestic and international.  While it is expected that there may be some adjustments in the requirements for certain businesses, at this time there are no exemptions provided for businesses based on the size of a firm or facility.

The scope of the FSMA is expansive.  In essence, it creates a continuous chain of accountability from the farm to the table.  While resources for this Act have not yet materialized – or even been requested of Congress by the Food & Drug Administration (FDA) – it is clear that the monetary impact of implementing these new requirements is going to be felt by the food industry.  It is crucial that companies doing business that fall under FDA jurisdiction begin reviewing and modifying policies and procedures now in order to assure timely compliance.

The FSMA was signed into law on Jan 4, 2011, and many parts of the legislation became effective immediately. This included increased authority of the FDA to demand records access; greater frequency of inspections increasing based on risk-based priorities; strengthened “whistle-blower” protection; and mandatory recall authority for products that have a reasonable probability of serious adverse health consequences.

Measures that are part of the FSMA, but are not immediately in effect, include certification by certain entities of all food articles – in place since the end of 2013.  The Act states that they will be an agency or representative of the government of the country from which the article originates, or as the FDA designates, other third party auditors.

The criteria to be used in this placing a product on this list include: known safety risks for a particular food, country or region of origin of the food, or based on scientific, risk-based evidence of inadequacy of the food safety system of the country or region of origin.

In addition to the above certification, the FSMA also requires food facilities to implement a written preventive control (safety) plan, including provisions for monitoring of the effectiveness of those controls and develop written corrective action plans for potential mishaps.  While there is currently an FDA Food Facility Registration in place, adherence and inclusion are expected to be more broadly required.  Record-keeping systems and traceability will be highlighted, and food facilities which have not previously been required to do so will now be required to complete a risk-based Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP) plan.

Attend an upcoming seminar or webinar to assist you in becoming more informed regarding this Act.