Archive for the ‘Trade Shows’ Category


 

How to Import for a Trade Show in the U.S. or Canada

Trade Show Imports Stand

Are you attending a trade show across the border? This post will teach you what you need to know about Trade Show Imports into the U.S. or Canada.

Trade Show Imports: Saul Better Call Us

Saul was going to display his super duper machine at a trade show in Houston, Texas. His machine was bound to be a disruptor in the market and he was excited to show it off. Saul booked his booth, made his travel plans and hooked his machine to the back of his pick up, threw his promotional material in his suitcase and headed for the border.

What Saul did not know was he had to take certain steps before he made his way out of Canada and into the U.S.

  1. He did not realize that the window cleaner and paper towel he would use to clean his display booth each night is considered a consumable item and would need a declaration for the portion used while he was in the U.S.
  2. Saul did not know that the promotional material he would distribute at the event would need a consumption entry
  3. He did not understand that the super duper machine would need a bond to avoid paying the entire amount of duties and taxes.

 

Needless to say, Saul was late to his trade show and he had a few more expenses (in the form of penalties) that he did not account for in his budget.

With 2018 freshly upon us you might have the same opportunity ahead. A trade show could likely be on your horizon. If you are asking the question “how can I get my trade show goods across the border?” first off, kudos to you for researching. Secondly, hooray, you have come to the right place.

In this blog you will find a practical checklist to help you prepare for an international trade show. As well as, what you will need to know to import your trade goods into the U.S. or Canada.


Trade Show Imports Checklist (7)

(1) Take Inventory

Make a list of what you want to bring to the show and split the list into two sections.

Section One

Section one will include everything you want to leave behind. Anything you would use, consume, giveaway or sell while in the country.

Section Two

The second section will include everything you will bring home.

(2) Remove Purchasable Products

If you have an item that will be used or consumed in the visiting country, a simple option is to buy the product once you arrive rather than import them. A good example would be cleaning supplies. Even something as simple as glass cleaner could provide a hold-up at customs. Purchasing supplies in the country you are visiting will eliminate risks when clearing customs.

(3) Are the Goods Eligible?

Check with Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA), U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), the Participating Government Agency, or your Customs Broker to see if there are any restrictions on the goods you are wanting to take to the show.

(4) Marking, Quantity & Packaging

All samples must meet marking regulations, and they must be within the country’s quantity and packaging requirements. Otherwise your goods could experience delays or be seized at customs.

(5) Entry Type

Find out from your customs broker what is the best type of entry to use for your goods. A Customs Broker will be able to help with your timeline requirements and potentially reduce your costs at customs.

(6) Letter of Recognition

The International Events and Convention Services Program (IECSP) was developed to encourage businesses and organizations to hold trade shows, conventions, events and exhibitions in Canada. They provide guidance and information to facilitate event participants, foreign exhibitors, and temporary imported goods and materials, into and out of Canada.

CBSA offers the IECSP in order for you to have one primary contact to provide you with federal government services and requirements associated with international events and conventions taking place in Canada.

The event organizer will often work alongside the IECSP’s Regional Coordinator to ensure all parties are prepared for customs entry. Once CBSA recognizes the event, they will provide a letter of recognition to the event organizers, the customs broker or designated event representatives.

The letter will contain:

  • The name and type of event
  • The date and location of the event
  • The expected number of participants
  • Who is responsible for processing any CBSA documents
    • Event Organizer
    • Customs Broker
    • Delegated Representative
  • Goods brought into Canada, their origin and intended use
  • Controlled goods being imported
  • Goods that will be sold or given away
  • If applicable, a note requesting the event be considered for Border to Show Service
  • What goods can possibly enter duty free and/or receive partial relief from GST/HST

It is important for you to get a copy of the letter of recognition to ensure your entry process at the border is smooth.

(7) Time Limits

Some imports must be exported within a certain time frame. Take note of the entry date to make sure you do not go past expiry. For instance, the IECSP requires 15-30 business days notice in order to help you prepare for the customs clearance. If the request is made with less than 15 business days it is up to the IECSP’s Regional Coordinator to decide whether or not to provide a letter of recognition.

 


Trade Show Importing into the U.S.

Is Your Import Duty Free?

Souvenirs, branded paraphernalia and advertising materials are eligible to be duty free if they can be applied to a Free Trade Agreement. Office machines and equipment can be duty free if they enter under a Temporary Import Bond (TIB). For commercial samples and apparel samples, they can enter the country duty free if their value is less than $1.00 USD. For anything over $1.00 USD, to be considered duty free, customs must modify the goods to the point where they are unsuitable for resale. This is done by marking, tearing, perforating, gluing, or otherwise altering the goods.

Is a Merchandise Processing Fee Applied?

All of your imports require a merchandise processing fee unless they are under a Free Trade Agreement. Unsure of what a Merchandise process Fee is? Check out our Blog Merchandise Processing Fee (MPF) Explained.

Your Recommended Entry

Consumption entries are recommended for souvenirs, branded paraphernalia, advertising material, and commercial/apparel samples. For office machines and equipment where the duty is above $100.00 USD you would be best suited to import under a Temporary Import Bond. Keep in mind Temporary Import Bond items must be exported within 12 months of entry.

Errors You Will Most Often See

In speaking with our U.S. release Operations Manager, Breanna Leininger, she described the most common errors you will see when you try to import items for a trade show into the U.S.:

“The most common errors we see are in packaging and invoicing.  When looking to import goods into the U.S. for a tradeshow it is vitally important to package and invoice consumables such as giveaways separate from the trade show booth. This will prove to be helpful if you are flagged for inspection, as well as open you up to entry filing options that will save you time, money, and a headache.”

Note: We recommend getting items you could buy from a store, such as cleaning supplies, in the country your trade show is in. Items purchased in a store can require additional statements and manufacturing information you may not have access to when purchasing from a store.

Trade Show Imports U.S.

 

 

 


Trade Show Importing into Canada

Is Your Import Duty Free?

Souvenirs are duty free if a Free Trade Agreement can be applied. Branded paraphernalia is duty free as long as it is exported back with you. Office machines and equipment, as well as, display goods are duty free if they are exported within 18 months. For advertising materials, most paper goods are conditionally duty free, any other materials must be applicable to a Free Trade Agreement. Finally, commercial samples and apparel samples are duty free.

Is Your Import GST Exempt?

Souvenirs and advertising materials are not exempt. Branded paraphernalia is exempt if it is exported. Office machines and equipment are GST exempt. Commercial samples and apparel samples are GST exempt if only one of each is displayed or if the samples are clearly not for resale. Finally, display goods are exempt as long as they are exported within 6 months.

Your Recommended Entry

Souvenirs and advertising materials intended for sale or consumption in Canada must be accounted for on a B3. Any branded paraphernalia left in Canada must also be accounted for on a B3. E29Bs are required for returning branded paraphernalia, office machines and equipment, as well as, display goods.

Errors You Will Most Often See

In speaking with our Canadian release Operations Manager, Cherie Storms, she described the most common errors you will see when you try to import items for a trade show into Canada:

“Forgetting to ask the event organizer if the event has been approved by CBSA, and if so, travelling with the approval letter which supports the purpose of entry. Also, bringing in consumables that will not be returned, forgetting that there may be duties and taxes on those”.

Trade Show Imports Canada

 

 

 


Why You Should Declare Your Trade Show Imports

Not declaring items intended for business purposes is illegal. Customs can make samples useless for resale and your goods could even be seized or destroyed. Keep in mind not being prepared at customs can delay your journey. Being forced to complete all of the paperwork at the port of entry can be a huge headache and time consuming. Knowing before you go will make your trade show experience pain-free.

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U.S. Made Goods Returned – Not Always Duty Free

Stamp: Made in USA
Goods manufactured in the United States that have been previously exported and are now returning require a formal declaration called American Goods Returned (AGR) also referred to as U.S. made Goods Returned (USGR).

Common mistake made by importers

Do not assume that the return of goods to the United States will be without some difficulty. A common mistake that importers make when declaring U.S. goods is that they do not know where the products were manufactured. Just because the product was purchased in the United States it doesn’t necessarily mean it was manufactured in the United States.

U.S. Goods Returning are usually eligible for duty-free status

All goods are subject to duty every time they enter the U.S. unless they are specifically identified as duty exempt. Did you know U.S. goods returning to the United States are usually eligible for duty-free treatment? The provision 9801.00.10 in the Harmonized Tariff Schedule allows U.S. made products to return to the U.S. without being subject to duty and the Merchandise Processing Fee. However, the provision stipulates the goods cannot be advanced in value or the condition of the goods improved while abroad.

Example 1: U.S. Manufactured Helicopter Sent to Canada for Repairs

For example, say you are the owner of a helicopter manufactured in the USA. The helicopter has electrical problems and you send it to a repair shop in Canada. When the helicopter returns the value of the repairs may be subject to duty.

American Goods Returned - Example 1

 

Example 2: Canadian Company Purchases Goods from the U.S.

American Goods Returned - Example 2

Another example would be goods purchased from the U.S. by a Canadian company. They received their shipment and the goods were refused by the buyer because they did not meet their product specifications. The goods can be returned to the U.S. duty free if the proper documentation can be supplied to U.S. customs.

 

Documentation required for U.S. Goods Returning duty free:

The most common proof is a Manufacturer’s Affidavit. Like the name implies, this form is completed by the actual manufacturer of the goods. U.S. customs requires this for any shipments that are valued over $2500 and if the articles are not clearly marked with the name and address of the manufacturer.

The affidavit must:

  • State that the goods are a product of the USA
  • Be on the U.S. manufacturer’s letterhead and
  • Signed by an employee from the U.S. manufacturers facility that has the authority to sign on behalf of the company.

As supporting proof of U.S. Goods returning, U.S. Customs also requires:

  • Foreign Shipper’s Declaration and
  • Declaration by Owner, Consignee or Agent

At some U.S. ports of entry, Customs will accept a NAFTA Certificate that is completed by the manufacturer.

Next time you get ready to ship U.S. goods remember it is not always as easy as it seems. Be sure to supply the proper paperwork to support your duty free return!

 

Do you have questions about U.S. Goods Returning? Drop us a comment or question below or email us at Ask Your Broker.

 

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Join Us for the Export-Import Virtual Trade Show

EXPORT-IMPORT-VIRTUAL-TRADESHOWAre you looking to start an exporting or importing business? Or considering expanding your business to new markets through trade? Don’t miss this unique opportunity to network with BC’s best trade experts!

 

What: The Export-Import Virtual Trade Show

Where: Comfort of Your Own Office – Online

When: Thursday, April 18, 2013

Time: 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. (PST)

Registration: Free of Charge

Event Registration: Visit Registration Page

 

Join us online to network with over 20 organizations that can help your business:

  • Discover your global potential
  • Define your trade strategy
  • Determine your sales and sourcing strategy
  • Obtain financing
  • Strategize logistics and understand regulations
  • Understand the legal and tax implications of trade

 

The Export-Import Virtual Trade Show will be a day of live educational trade webinars and a virtual trade show, including public and private organizations that will help you expand your business internationally. Experts will be available through live chat and webinar  from the comfort of your own office. Registration is free, courtesy of Tradestart.ca.

Pacific Customs Brokers is proud to participate in:

  1. Exhibiting at the Export-Import Virtual Trade Show from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00  p.m (PST). Register online today!
  2. Presenting a live educational trade webinar on ‘Customs and Shipping Across International Borders’. We strongly encourage you to register and send us your questions live on April 18th, 2013.

 

We welcome you to take of advantage of this fantastic opportunity to expand your knowledge and explore new markets. See you at this first-of-its-kind virtual trade show!

Have questions about the Export-Import Virtual Trade Show? Leave them in our comments section below or email Ask Your Broker.