Archive for the ‘Exporting’ Category


 

How The Proposed Tariffs Affect You In The U.S.-China Trade War

China U.S. Trade War Proposed Tariffs

For the second time in July the U.S. government has placed additional tariffs on products exported from China and imported into the U.S.  If the proposed tariffs were actioned, there would be changes for both American and Canadian importers. How will the additional tariffs on Chinese manufactured goods affect trade between the United States and Canada?

The Proposed Tariffs Effect On Canadians

Canada is already in the midst of a trade war with the U.S.  Now Canada is unwittingly affected by the trade war between the U.S. and China because many items proposed for additional tariffs are manufactured in China, exported to Canada and then finally exported into the U.S.  The additional tariffs levied against Chinese goods are applicable to goods manufactured in China without regard to the previous country of export.

Canada has enjoyed a long standing trade partnership with the U.S.  Canadian companies often act as Non-Resident Importers; handling all of the import requirements including payment of duties and taxes. This has allowed Canadians to sell their goods to companies in the U.S. as seamlessly as a U.S. company. This allows Canadian exporters to expand their market beyond the Canadian border.

The third list of tariffs released on July 11th cover consumer goods such as furniture, seafood, automobile parts, televisions and video equipment, which we see our clients from Canada ship on a daily basis.

Even though the trade war is between the U.S. and China, other countries are affected because they, like the U.S., have their goods manufactured in China.

Many of the items on the proposed list such as furniture and seafood, which are normally duty free, will be dutiable at 10% if the proposed tariffs are actioned.

If you are a Canadian company who exports Chinese manufactured products into the U.S. you will need to consider how you will address the increase in cost of exporting to Americans.

The Proposed Tariffs Effect On Americans

Over 75% of the new tariffs target machinery for manufacturing goods, electrical equipment, televisions, recorders, bicycles, bicycle parts, and automobile parts: all merchandise which is in high demand with american consumers. With the U.S. being a consumer based economy, where the consumer is interested in paying the lowest price possible, this new legislation would have an adverse effect on the U.S. economy.

In short order, the increase in costs to bring goods into the U.S. will increase costs for producers, importers and ultimately the consumer. This is never a popular solution, however the U.S. has tried to entice China to come to the table to discuss revising their unfair trade practices.  

The additional tariffs were initiated to combat Chinese regulations that require companies wishing to do business in China partner with a chinese company and share the technology associated with their products leading to violations of both intellectual property rights and World Trade Organization (WTO) rules.

Some economists say that a more appropriate way to combat these unfair trade practices would be to band together with other countries and take their concerns to the WTO to initiate a lawsuit against China.

In the long run, if the two countries can come to a satisfactory solution to the root of the issue the U.S. will benefit greatly and the trade deficit will balance out.

The Proposed Tariffs Affect On U.S. Import Bonds

How will the increased duties affect your import bond? Bond limits are set based on duties, taxes and fees paid in a 12 month period. With the increased duties, higher bond limits may be required. In addition to the higher bond limits, the surety company may request financial documents and collateral to secure the bond.

Your Guide To The Proposed Tariffs

This is a retaliatory move by the U.S. to address concerns of intellectual property rights.

The United States Trade Representative (USTR) will be holding a hearing August 20th-23rd on the impact the proposed tariffs will have if imposed. In order to appear at the hearing, submission must be made before July 27th, which must include a summary of the expected testimony. Written comments can be submitted to the USTR from now until August 17th, 2018.

A decision on if the additional 10% tariff will be imposed or not is expected to be announced at the end of August, after the hearings.

This 10% will be in addition to the already imposed 25% tariff on $34 billion worth of goods from China that came into effect on July 6th, 2018. China retaliates with a reciprocal tariff increase on U.S. commodities imported into China.

How You Can Prepare For The Proposed Tariffs

As a business it is best for you to be proactive in your approach to the impending changes. Contacting a trade professionals for advice on how the proposed legislation could affect your company will provide you with the knowledge to make quick decisions when change inevitably comes.

This includes understanding;

  • What country has the most cost effective solution to source your materials from,
  • Determining your rate of duty if there were changes to the proposed tariffs or NAFTA,
  • Education to make yourself prepared for current practices and future changes, as well as,
  • Freight costs to get your products from your source to you.

All of these services are provided to you by our Trade Advisory experts in Canada and the U.S. Contact us to start a conversation with a Trade Advisor today.

 

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Possible Trade War: U.S. and Canada

 

Canada, the U.S. and Mexico Flags NAFTA

On June 1, 2018, the U.S. committed to a 25% tariff on imports of steel and 10% tariff on aluminum, on the European Union, Canada and Mexico. The tariffs have triggered retaliatory tariffs on U.S. goods and heightened the chance of a trade war.

The U.S. steel industry will initially benefit from the tariff increase through decreased international competition, driving up the price of U.S. steel and therefore the profits. These profits can be reinvested into the steel industry by improving their technologies and potentially providing more job opportunities.

A potential downfall to the tariff increase is retaliatory measures from U.S. trade partners, as is the case with Canada. Canada has announced $16.6 billion in retaliatory tariffs. The Canadian tariffs will go into effect July 1, 2018, and cover a broad range of commodities. Some, mainly unfinished iron and steel products will be hit with a 25% tariff, while others including many consumer products will be hit with a 10% duty.

 

If history repeats itself, trade policy experts warn tariff increases could cause future harm. An example of this was in 2002, when the U.S. enacted a tariff of 8% to 30% on international steel. The increased tariffs set off a chain reaction with the European Union responding with tariffs of its own and a number of countries disputed the tariffs at the World Trade Organization. The WTO ruled the U.S. violated the international trade agreements, and opened the door for sanctions and retaliation. Retaliation by the EU cost many Americans their jobs, and in late 2003 the U.S. Government reversed the sanctions.

Canada’s Stance

The tariffs could cost the Canadian economy over $3 billion a year.  According to the Canadian Steel Producers Association, Canada is the largest supplier of steel and aluminum to the U.S.  Approximately 90% of Canada’s steel is exported to the U.S. The price of steel and aluminum is going to go up as a result of these tariffs and jobs will be lost in Canada. Steel production employs around 22,000 people in Canada concentrated mainly in Ontario. Canada exports around 84% of its aluminum to the U.S., which represents around 8,300 jobs in the aluminum sector with the majority being in Quebec.

Canadian consumers can expect to pay more for products imported from the U.S. that are largely made of steel and aluminum which could apply to anything from cars, refrigerators, canned sodas and beer.

International Stance

China, and the European Union have also responded negatively to the U.S. tariff increases. Brazil contributes 13%, followed by South Korea at 10%, and Mexico at 9%. The original target China only imports 2% of the U.S. steel imports.

Along with fighting the tariffs at the World Trade Organization, European officials have been preparing levies on an estimated $3 billion worth of imported American products in late June. In a joint statement, ministers from France and Germany said the countries would coordinate their response.

Steel and Aluminum Statistics

Below you can see a few interesting statistics on Canada-U.S. cross-border steel and aluminum trade.

  • In 2017, Canada exported nearly $17 billion of steel and aluminum products into the U.S. (Statistics Canada)
  • More than $14 billion of steel crossed the Canada-U.S. border in 2017 (Canadian Steel Producers Association)
  • Canada exported $11.1 billion of aluminum and aluminum articles to the U.S. in 2017 compared to $3.6 billion of imports from the U.S. (Statistics Canada)
  • Close to 45% of Canada’s steel production is exported to the U.S.  Predominantly to Michigan, Ohio, Illinois, and New York.
  • Over 50% of American steel exports go to Canada.
  • Canada sent more than $5.6 billion of primary aluminum exports to the U. S. in 2016. New York, Kentucky, Michigan and Pennsylvania are the top destinations.
  • Between 2000 and 2015, Canada’s share of world aluminum production fell from 10% to 5%. For the U.S. from 15% to 2.7%. While China’s increased from 11% to 55%.
  • U.S. aluminum production fell following the 2008 financial crisis and recession. It was up 6.9% in 2018 from 2017.
  • Canadian aluminum production is down 7.6% for the first two months of 2018 compared to the same time in 2017.

The Beginning of the End for NAFTA?

With the likelyhood of eliminating multilateral trade agreements in favor of bilateral trade agreements. In order to have control over your trade in these uncertain times, you must arm yourself with the knowledge of what your duty rates will be without NAFTA, alternative countries of origin for your imported goods and freight quotations on getting your goods from your new origin to the final destination.

You can talk with our trusted trade advisors to determine your rate of duty without NAFTA. Click here to get in contact with a trade advisory expert today.

Jan Brock | Author

 

 

 

 

 

 

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St. Patrick’s Day and Irish Trade

Pot of Gold Leprichaun Hat

St. Patrick’s Day, the holiday that started from Saint Patrick, a 5th-century missionary. Today we know it as a celebration of Irish culture. St. Patrick’s Day is unique because, according to Time, it is globally the most celebrated national holiday. The Irish who have dispersed around the globe have brought their culture along with them; however, the Irish have more than just fun culture to offer. In this post we will take a look at how a beautiful country with wonderful people has positively contributed to the world of trade.

High-Tech Industry

If you were to visit Dublin, Ireland and walk along the Dublin Docks you would be doing a double take on where you are. The docks are lined with large, futuristic buildings that don’t make you think about the quaintness of Ireland, but rather the tech giants of Silicon Valley. This is because Ireland has attracted the biggest and brightest U.S. tech companies. How? With the most profitable tax rates. Ireland is the world’s most profitable country for U.S. corporations. With a corporate tax rate of only 12.5% companies like Apple, Facebook, Google and Twitter have large offices located on the Dublin Docks. U.S. corporations receive benefits from the lower corporate tax rates while being able to pull from an English-speaking pool of potential employees.

The Tara Mines

In the early 1970’s an exploring team discovered the Tara Mines. You might be thinking what is special about the Tara Mines, Ireland and trade? Well, the Tara Mines contain the largest amount of zinc found in Europe and is the 9th largest zinc mine in the world. Zinc is important because it is used to galvanize other metals. This helps prevent metals such as steel and iron from corroding or rusting.

The Tara Mines also contain a large amount of lead, specifically the 2nd largest amount in Europe. Lead is important because it is used in many items we use on a daily basis which includes car batteries, ammunition, weights, radiation protection and paints just to name a few.

Big Pharmaceutical

The beneficial tax rates not only helped attract the top U.S. tech companies, but also the pharmaceutical industry. Amazingly, Ireland has 9 of the top 10 largest pharmaceutical companies in the world. Even at the low corporate tax rates of 12.5% Ireland receives over €1 billion in corporate tax every year. Every time you take some medicine for an ailment or allergic reaction, there is a very good chance the best and brightest in Ireland lent a helping hand.

Counting Sheep

Ireland’s main economic resource is its large fertile pastures. Just under 10% of all Irish exports are agricultural foods and drinks. The beautiful natural scenery throughout Ireland lends itself to over 5 million sheep and just under a million cattle. Interesting fact, there are more sheep in Ireland than humans.

The Luck of the Irish

The Irish have a lot to be proud of. Not only do they have wonderful people with a fun-loving culture, but a strong export economy that helps many people in many countries. If you want to explore your options and import products from Ireland or Northern Ireland, contact us to see how a trade advisory expert can help you. The luck of the Irish may be on your side.

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How to Import for a Trade Show in the U.S. or Canada

 

 

Trade Show Imports Stand

Are you attending a trade show across the border? This post will teach you what you need to know about Trade Show Imports into the U.S. or Canada.

Trade Show Imports: Saul Better Call Us

Saul was going to display his super duper machine at a trade show in Houston, Texas. His machine was bound to be a disruptor in the market and he was excited to show it off. Saul booked his booth, made his travel plans and hooked his machine to the back of his pick up, threw his promotional material in his suitcase and headed for the border.

What Saul did not know was he had to take certain steps before he made his way out of Canada and into the U.S.

  1. He did not realize that the entire bottle of window cleaner would need to be declared and the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) would require a statement for the declaration.
  2. Saul did not know that the promotional material he would distribute at the event would need a consumption entry
  3. He did not understand that the super duper machine could be a consumption entry or a bond. A consumption entry would be the better choice if the machine is dutiable. If it is not dutiable, it would be better to use a bond. However, a bond comes with a tight timeline and increases the chance of a penalty.

 

Needless to say, Saul was late to his trade show and he had a few more expenses (in the form of penalties) that he did not account for in his budget.

With 2018 freshly upon us you might have the same opportunity ahead. A trade show could likely be on your horizon. If you are asking the question “how can I get my trade show goods across the border?” first off, kudos to you for researching. Secondly, hooray, you have come to the right place.

In this blog you will find a practical checklist to help you prepare for an international trade show. As well as, what you will need to know to import your trade goods into the U.S. or Canada.


Trade Show Imports Checklist (7)

(1) Take Inventory

Make a list of what you want to bring to the show and split the list into two sections.

Section One

Section one will include anything you could leave behind. Anything you would use, consume, giveaway or sell while in the country.

Section Two

The second section will include everything you will bring home in its entirety.

(2) Remove Purchasable Products

If you have an item that will be used or consumed in the visiting country, a simple option is to buy the product once you arrive rather than import them. A good example would be cleaning supplies. Even something as simple as glass cleaner could provide a hold-up at customs. Purchasing supplies in the country you are visiting will eliminate risks when clearing customs.

(3) Are the Goods Eligible?

Check with Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA), U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), the Participating Government Agency, or your Customs Broker to see if there are any restrictions on the goods you are wanting to take to the show.

(4) Marking, Quantity & Packaging

All samples must meet marking regulations, and they must be within the country’s quantity and packaging requirements. Otherwise your goods could experience delays or be seized at customs.

(5) Entry Type

Find out from your customs broker what is the best type of entry to use for your goods. A Customs Broker will be able to help with your timeline requirements and potentially reduce your costs at customs.

(6) Letter of Recognition

The International Events and Convention Services Program (IECSP) was developed to encourage businesses and organizations to hold trade shows, conventions, events and exhibitions in Canada. They provide guidance and information to facilitate event participants, foreign exhibitors, and temporary imported goods and materials, into and out of Canada.

CBSA offers the IECSP in order for you to have one primary contact to provide you with federal government services and requirements associated with international events and conventions taking place in Canada.

Some trade shows will have a letter of recognition that is provided from CBSA to the event organizer. If the trade show you are attending has a letter of recognition you will be able to contact the event organizer for a copy of the letter of recognition.

If your Trade Show has a letter of recognition, the letter will contain:

  • The name and type of event
  • The date and location of the event
  • The expected number of participants
  • Who is responsible for processing any CBSA documents
    • Event Organizer
    • Customs Broker
    • Delegated Representative
  • A list of goods brought into Canada, their origin and intended use
  • A list of controlled goods being imported
  • A list of goods that will be sold or given away
  • If applicable, a note requesting the event be considered for Border to Show Service
  • What goods can possibly enter duty free and/or receive partial relief from GST/HST

What if the trade show you are attending does not have a letter of recognition? If your trade show does not have a letter of recognition, it means you have no designated exemptions.

(7) Time Limits

Some temporary imports and sample imports must be exported within a certain time frame. Take note of the entry date to make sure you do not go past expiry.

 


Trade Show Importing into the U.S.

Is Your Import Duty Free?

Your import will be duty free if it is recognized in a letter of recognition, if it is imported under a Temporary Import Bond (TIB), or if it is eligible to be imported under a Free Trade Agreement.

Is a Merchandise Processing Fee Applied?

All of your imports require a merchandise processing fee unless they are under a Free Trade Agreement. Unsure of what a Merchandise process Fee is? Check out our Blog Merchandise Processing Fee (MPF) Explained.

Your Recommended Entry

Consumption entries are recommended for anything that is consumable. Any goods where the duty is above $100.00 USD you would best be suited to import under a Temporary Import Bond. Keep in mind Temporary Import Bond items must be exported within 6-12 months depending on the commodity.

Errors You Will Most Often See

In speaking with our U.S. release Operations Manager, Breanna Leininger, she described the most common errors you will see when you try to import items for a trade show into the U.S.:

“The most common errors we see are in packaging and invoicing.  When looking to import goods into the U.S. for a tradeshow it is vitally important to package and invoice consumables such as giveaways separate from the trade show booth. This will prove to be helpful if you are flagged for inspection, as well as open you up to entry filing options that will save you time, money, and a headache.”

Note: We recommend getting items you could buy from a store, such as cleaning supplies, in the country your trade show is in. Items purchased in a store can require additional statements and manufacturing information you may not have access to when purchasing from a store.

Trade Show Imports U.S.

 

 

 


Trade Show Importing into Canada

Is Your Import Duty Free? Tax Free?

Your import will be duty free if it is recognized in a letter of recognition, if it is imported under a Temporary Import Bond, or if it is eligible to be imported under a Free Trade Agreement. To be tax free your import must either be imported on a Temporary Import Bond or waived by a letter of recognition.

Your Recommended Entry

Souvenirs and advertising materials intended for sale or consumption in Canada must be accounted for on a B3. Any branded paraphernalia left in Canada must also be accounted for on a B3. E29Bs are required for returning branded paraphernalia, office machines and equipment, as well as, display goods.

Errors You Will Most Often See

In speaking with our Canadian release Operations Manager, Cherie Storms, she described the most common errors you will see when you try to import items for a trade show into Canada:

“Forgetting to ask the event organizer if the event has been approved by CBSA, and if so, travelling with the approval letter which supports the purpose of entry. Also, bringing in consumables that will not be returned, forgetting that there may be duties and taxes on those”.

Trade Show Imports Canada

 

 

 


Why You Should Declare Your Trade Show Imports

Not declaring items intended for business purposes is illegal. Customs can make samples useless for resale and your goods could even be seized or destroyed. Keep in mind not being prepared at customs can delay your journey. Being forced to complete all of the paperwork at the port of entry can be a huge headache and time consuming. Knowing before you go will make your trade show experience pain-free.

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Perishables Shipping | 12 Questions Every Shipper Must Ask

Perishables Shipping | 12 Questions Every Shipper Must Ask

Seldom do shippers or product owners know or understand the terminologies or intricacies of perishables shipping to ensure safe, and seamless passage of their goods. Without industry expertise, critical shipment details may be overlooked resulting in product damage or contract loss. Here are tips and tools to be a successful perishables exporter.

When we are contacted to move perishables shipments, the conversation may include the commodity trade name and that it must be kept at a specific temperature. It is packed in boxes, on skids, and is delivering to a foreign city, ready for pickup tomorrow. We then ask them the following questions:

  • What are the Incoterms® (terms of sale)?
  • Is there a letter of credit (L/C) involved?
  • How many commodities (SKU) make up the shipment?
  • What are the weights and dimensions of each shipping piece?
  • Are any pallets used certified and does the product contain the required markings?
  • Have the pallets been shrink-wrapped and were corners used?
  • Are there temperature recorders on the freight?
  • *What export documentation has been prepared to accompany the shipment?
  • Will your company file the B13A export document for Statistics Canada?
  • ** Does your product require phytosanitary certificates and has the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) completed the
  • inspection?
  • What mode of transport is optimal: air, ocean, or highway?
  • Has this shipment been pre-quoted – what is the quote reference?

TIP: Be ready to share your knowledge of the shipment to ensure proper handling and transportation to destination.

This list of condensed questions will start a conversation about a perishables shipment. It is important to note that although the client is familiar with their products and may not understand the need for these questions, we are not and therefore are required to ask in order to meet your specific shipping requirements. This ever-changing field is a constant learning process for freight forwarders and carriers. The freight forwarder, the person in charge of the shipment, must have a clear understanding of the shipment to be able to react to any situation following pickup from origin door. This would include after hours and weekends when the shipper is not available.

TIP: Be proactive and start the discussion early.

From this list of questions the conversation continues until we have a complete picture of the shipment and knowledge of where, when and how it must move. From door to door any number of issues, security measures or documentation questions can arise that would cause a delay and/or negative result.

Conversely the carriers – truckers, steamship lines and airlines – have a similar list of questions when the freight forwarder is booking the shipment. If we are not able to provide a complete understanding of the shipment, those carriers may have doubts about a successful delivery, which could affect them supplying a booking confirmation and final freight rates as a matter of liability. All parties involved in a freight movement want to deliver the shipment in its best possible condition, on time and as quoted. Carriers are bound by the information contained in the bill of lading and/or in the booking confirmation. Therefore, all questions must be asked, answered and understood, and itemized on the export documentation and on-hand with the freight forwarder.

TIP: Exporters must be as detailed as possible when organizing their shipments. Be ready and prepared to share all information with your freight forwarder so they can ensure the documentation is correct and in order, as well as being your conduit to the carriers. If your freight forwarder does not ask all these questions or is not available 24/7, you will require a freight forwarder that better meets your needs.

Finally, do not hesitate to ask any and all questions of your freight forwarder. They may not have all the answers exactly when you ask them but they gain the knowledge and reply as promptly as possible, as to put your mind at ease that you are receiving the best possible service.

We hope you will drop in again as this series on perishables shipping continues. If you have any questions or suggestions regarding the movement of perishable commodities, please do not hesitate to call us at 888.538.1566.