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Possible Trade War: U.S. and Canada

 

Canada, the U.S. and Mexico Flags NAFTA

On June 1, 2018, the U.S. committed to a 25% tariff on imports of steel and 10% tariff on aluminum, on the European Union, Canada and Mexico. The tariffs have triggered retaliatory tariffs on U.S. goods and heightened the chance of a trade war.

The U.S. steel industry will initially benefit from the tariff increase through decreased international competition, driving up the price of U.S. steel and therefore the profits. These profits can be reinvested into the steel industry by improving their technologies and potentially providing more job opportunities.

A potential downfall to the tariff increase is retaliatory measures from U.S. trade partners, as is the case with Canada. Canada has announced $16.6 billion in retaliatory tariffs. The Canadian tariffs will go into effect July 1, 2018, and cover a broad range of commodities. Some, mainly unfinished iron and steel products will be hit with a 25% tariff, while others including many consumer products will be hit with a 10% duty.

 

If history repeats itself, trade policy experts warn tariff increases could cause future harm. An example of this was in 2002, when the U.S. enacted a tariff of 8% to 30% on international steel. The increased tariffs set off a chain reaction with the European Union responding with tariffs of its own and a number of countries disputed the tariffs at the World Trade Organization. The WTO ruled the U.S. violated the international trade agreements, and opened the door for sanctions and retaliation. Retaliation by the EU cost many Americans their jobs, and in late 2003 the U.S. Government reversed the sanctions.

Canada’s Stance

The tariffs could cost the Canadian economy over $3 billion a year.  According to the Canadian Steel Producers Association, Canada is the largest supplier of steel and aluminum to the U.S.  Approximately 90% of Canada’s steel is exported to the U.S. The price of steel and aluminum is going to go up as a result of these tariffs and jobs will be lost in Canada. Steel production employs around 22,000 people in Canada concentrated mainly in Ontario. Canada exports around 84% of its aluminum to the U.S., which represents around 8,300 jobs in the aluminum sector with the majority being in Quebec.

Canadian consumers can expect to pay more for products imported from the U.S. that are largely made of steel and aluminum which could apply to anything from cars, refrigerators, canned sodas and beer.

International Stance

China, and the European Union have also responded negatively to the U.S. tariff increases. Brazil contributes 13%, followed by South Korea at 10%, and Mexico at 9%. The original target China only imports 2% of the U.S. steel imports.

Along with fighting the tariffs at the World Trade Organization, European officials have been preparing levies on an estimated $3 billion worth of imported American products in late June. In a joint statement, ministers from France and Germany said the countries would coordinate their response.

Steel and Aluminum Statistics

Below you can see a few interesting statistics on Canada-U.S. cross-border steel and aluminum trade.

  • In 2017, Canada exported nearly $17 billion of steel and aluminum products into the U.S. (Statistics Canada)
  • More than $14 billion of steel crossed the Canada-U.S. border in 2017 (Canadian Steel Producers Association)
  • Canada exported $11.1 billion of aluminum and aluminum articles to the U.S. in 2017 compared to $3.6 billion of imports from the U.S. (Statistics Canada)
  • Close to 45% of Canada’s steel production is exported to the U.S.  Predominantly to Michigan, Ohio, Illinois, and New York.
  • Over 50% of American steel exports go to Canada.
  • Canada sent more than $5.6 billion of primary aluminum exports to the U. S. in 2016. New York, Kentucky, Michigan and Pennsylvania are the top destinations.
  • Between 2000 and 2015, Canada’s share of world aluminum production fell from 10% to 5%. For the U.S. from 15% to 2.7%. While China’s increased from 11% to 55%.
  • U.S. aluminum production fell following the 2008 financial crisis and recession. It was up 6.9% in 2018 from 2017.
  • Canadian aluminum production is down 7.6% for the first two months of 2018 compared to the same time in 2017.

The Beginning of the End for NAFTA?

With the likelyhood of eliminating multilateral trade agreements in favor of bilateral trade agreements. In order to have control over your trade in these uncertain times, you must arm yourself with the knowledge of what your duty rates will be without NAFTA, alternative countries of origin for your imported goods and freight quotations on getting your goods from your new origin to the final destination.

You can talk with our trusted trade advisors to determine your rate of duty without NAFTA. Click here to get in contact with a trade advisory expert today.

Jan Brock | Author

 

 

 

 

 

 

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St. Patrick’s Day and Irish Trade

Pot of Gold Leprichaun Hat

St. Patrick’s Day, the holiday that started from Saint Patrick, a 5th-century missionary. Today we know it as a celebration of Irish culture. St. Patrick’s Day is unique because, according to Time, it is globally the most celebrated national holiday. The Irish who have dispersed around the globe have brought their culture along with them; however, the Irish have more than just fun culture to offer. In this post we will take a look at how a beautiful country with wonderful people has positively contributed to the world of trade.

High-Tech Industry

If you were to visit Dublin, Ireland and walk along the Dublin Docks you would be doing a double take on where you are. The docks are lined with large, futuristic buildings that don’t make you think about the quaintness of Ireland, but rather the tech giants of Silicon Valley. This is because Ireland has attracted the biggest and brightest U.S. tech companies. How? With the most profitable tax rates. Ireland is the world’s most profitable country for U.S. corporations. With a corporate tax rate of only 12.5% companies like Apple, Facebook, Google and Twitter have large offices located on the Dublin Docks. U.S. corporations receive benefits from the lower corporate tax rates while being able to pull from an English-speaking pool of potential employees.

The Tara Mines

In the early 1970’s an exploring team discovered the Tara Mines. You might be thinking what is special about the Tara Mines, Ireland and trade? Well, the Tara Mines contain the largest amount of zinc found in Europe and is the 9th largest zinc mine in the world. Zinc is important because it is used to galvanize other metals. This helps prevent metals such as steel and iron from corroding or rusting.

The Tara Mines also contain a large amount of lead, specifically the 2nd largest amount in Europe. Lead is important because it is used in many items we use on a daily basis which includes car batteries, ammunition, weights, radiation protection and paints just to name a few.

Big Pharmaceutical

The beneficial tax rates not only helped attract the top U.S. tech companies, but also the pharmaceutical industry. Amazingly, Ireland has 9 of the top 10 largest pharmaceutical companies in the world. Even at the low corporate tax rates of 12.5% Ireland receives over €1 billion in corporate tax every year. Every time you take some medicine for an ailment or allergic reaction, there is a very good chance the best and brightest in Ireland lent a helping hand.

Counting Sheep

Ireland’s main economic resource is its large fertile pastures. Just under 10% of all Irish exports are agricultural foods and drinks. The beautiful natural scenery throughout Ireland lends itself to over 5 million sheep and just under a million cattle. Interesting fact, there are more sheep in Ireland than humans.

The Luck of the Irish

The Irish have a lot to be proud of. Not only do they have wonderful people with a fun-loving culture, but a strong export economy that helps many people in many countries. If you want to explore your options and import products from Ireland or Northern Ireland, contact us to see how a trade advisory expert can help you. The luck of the Irish may be on your side.

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How to Import for a Trade Show in the U.S. or Canada

 

 

Trade Show Imports Stand

Are you attending a trade show across the border? This post will teach you what you need to know about Trade Show Imports into the U.S. or Canada.

Trade Show Imports: Saul Better Call Us

Saul was going to display his super duper machine at a trade show in Houston, Texas. His machine was bound to be a disruptor in the market and he was excited to show it off. Saul booked his booth, made his travel plans and hooked his machine to the back of his pick up, threw his promotional material in his suitcase and headed for the border.

What Saul did not know was he had to take certain steps before he made his way out of Canada and into the U.S.

  1. He did not realize that the entire bottle of window cleaner would need to be declared and the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) would require a statement for the declaration.
  2. Saul did not know that the promotional material he would distribute at the event would need a consumption entry
  3. He did not understand that the super duper machine could be a consumption entry or a bond. A consumption entry would be the better choice if the machine is dutiable. If it is not dutiable, it would be better to use a bond. However, a bond comes with a tight timeline and increases the chance of a penalty.

 

Needless to say, Saul was late to his trade show and he had a few more expenses (in the form of penalties) that he did not account for in his budget.

With 2018 freshly upon us you might have the same opportunity ahead. A trade show could likely be on your horizon. If you are asking the question “how can I get my trade show goods across the border?” first off, kudos to you for researching. Secondly, hooray, you have come to the right place.

In this blog you will find a practical checklist to help you prepare for an international trade show. As well as, what you will need to know to import your trade goods into the U.S. or Canada.


Trade Show Imports Checklist (7)

(1) Take Inventory

Make a list of what you want to bring to the show and split the list into two sections.

Section One

Section one will include anything you could leave behind. Anything you would use, consume, giveaway or sell while in the country.

Section Two

The second section will include everything you will bring home in its entirety.

(2) Remove Purchasable Products

If you have an item that will be used or consumed in the visiting country, a simple option is to buy the product once you arrive rather than import them. A good example would be cleaning supplies. Even something as simple as glass cleaner could provide a hold-up at customs. Purchasing supplies in the country you are visiting will eliminate risks when clearing customs.

(3) Are the Goods Eligible?

Check with Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA), U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), the Participating Government Agency, or your Customs Broker to see if there are any restrictions on the goods you are wanting to take to the show.

(4) Marking, Quantity & Packaging

All samples must meet marking regulations, and they must be within the country’s quantity and packaging requirements. Otherwise your goods could experience delays or be seized at customs.

(5) Entry Type

Find out from your customs broker what is the best type of entry to use for your goods. A Customs Broker will be able to help with your timeline requirements and potentially reduce your costs at customs.

(6) Letter of Recognition

The International Events and Convention Services Program (IECSP) was developed to encourage businesses and organizations to hold trade shows, conventions, events and exhibitions in Canada. They provide guidance and information to facilitate event participants, foreign exhibitors, and temporary imported goods and materials, into and out of Canada.

CBSA offers the IECSP in order for you to have one primary contact to provide you with federal government services and requirements associated with international events and conventions taking place in Canada.

Some trade shows will have a letter of recognition that is provided from CBSA to the event organizer. If the trade show you are attending has a letter of recognition you will be able to contact the event organizer for a copy of the letter of recognition.

If your Trade Show has a letter of recognition, the letter will contain:

  • The name and type of event
  • The date and location of the event
  • The expected number of participants
  • Who is responsible for processing any CBSA documents
    • Event Organizer
    • Customs Broker
    • Delegated Representative
  • A list of goods brought into Canada, their origin and intended use
  • A list of controlled goods being imported
  • A list of goods that will be sold or given away
  • If applicable, a note requesting the event be considered for Border to Show Service
  • What goods can possibly enter duty free and/or receive partial relief from GST/HST

What if the trade show you are attending does not have a letter of recognition? If your trade show does not have a letter of recognition, it means you have no designated exemptions.

(7) Time Limits

Some temporary imports and sample imports must be exported within a certain time frame. Take note of the entry date to make sure you do not go past expiry.

 


Trade Show Importing into the U.S.

Is Your Import Duty Free?

Your import will be duty free if it is recognized in a letter of recognition, if it is imported under a Temporary Import Bond (TIB), or if it is eligible to be imported under a Free Trade Agreement.

Is a Merchandise Processing Fee Applied?

All of your imports require a merchandise processing fee unless they are under a Free Trade Agreement. Unsure of what a Merchandise process Fee is? Check out our Blog Merchandise Processing Fee (MPF) Explained.

Your Recommended Entry

Consumption entries are recommended for anything that is consumable. Any goods where the duty is above $100.00 USD you would best be suited to import under a Temporary Import Bond. Keep in mind Temporary Import Bond items must be exported within 6-12 months depending on the commodity.

Errors You Will Most Often See

In speaking with our U.S. release Operations Manager, Breanna Leininger, she described the most common errors you will see when you try to import items for a trade show into the U.S.:

“The most common errors we see are in packaging and invoicing.  When looking to import goods into the U.S. for a tradeshow it is vitally important to package and invoice consumables such as giveaways separate from the trade show booth. This will prove to be helpful if you are flagged for inspection, as well as open you up to entry filing options that will save you time, money, and a headache.”

Note: We recommend getting items you could buy from a store, such as cleaning supplies, in the country your trade show is in. Items purchased in a store can require additional statements and manufacturing information you may not have access to when purchasing from a store.

Trade Show Imports U.S.

 

 

 


Trade Show Importing into Canada

Is Your Import Duty Free? Tax Free?

Your import will be duty free if it is recognized in a letter of recognition, if it is imported under a Temporary Import Bond, or if it is eligible to be imported under a Free Trade Agreement. To be tax free your import must either be imported on a Temporary Import Bond or waived by a letter of recognition.

Your Recommended Entry

Souvenirs and advertising materials intended for sale or consumption in Canada must be accounted for on a B3. Any branded paraphernalia left in Canada must also be accounted for on a B3. E29Bs are required for returning branded paraphernalia, office machines and equipment, as well as, display goods.

Errors You Will Most Often See

In speaking with our Canadian release Operations Manager, Cherie Storms, she described the most common errors you will see when you try to import items for a trade show into Canada:

“Forgetting to ask the event organizer if the event has been approved by CBSA, and if so, travelling with the approval letter which supports the purpose of entry. Also, bringing in consumables that will not be returned, forgetting that there may be duties and taxes on those”.

Trade Show Imports Canada

 

 

 


Why You Should Declare Your Trade Show Imports

Not declaring items intended for business purposes is illegal. Customs can make samples useless for resale and your goods could even be seized or destroyed. Keep in mind not being prepared at customs can delay your journey. Being forced to complete all of the paperwork at the port of entry can be a huge headache and time consuming. Knowing before you go will make your trade show experience pain-free.

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What You Need to Know About the Section 321 De Minimis Value Entry

 

Section 321 De Minimis Value Entry

 

A de minimis shipment commonly referred to as Section 321, allows for goods valued at $800 USD or less, to enter duty-free into the U.S. Under this legislation they are also permitted to enter without formal entry. Therefore, this regulation is a great option for importers to save money and time.

Law previous to February 24, 2016, only allowed for a de minimis value of $200 or less.

Some goods may not qualify under Section 321 under the following circumstances.

Section 321 Restrictions

  • Goods needing inspection as a condition of release, regardless of value
  • Merchandise subject to Anti-Dumping / Countervailing duty (ADD/CVD)
  • Products regulated by the following Partner Government Agencies (PGAs),:
    • *Food and Drug Administration (FDA)
    • Food Safety Inspection Service (FSIS)
    • National Highway Transport and Safety Administration (NHTSA)
    • Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSA)
    • United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)

*As of July 2017, the FDA has provided exemptions for this restriction for the following goods:

  • Cosmetics
  • Dinnerware
  • Radiation-emitting non-medical devices
  • Biological samples for laboratory testing
  • Food (excluding ackees, puffer fish, raw clams, raw oysters, raw mussels, and foods packed in airtight containers stored at room temperature)

 

Although the Section 321 option reduces the amount of paperwork required for low-value shipments, it creates a potential compliance pitfall.

Section 321 Daily Restriction

Especially relevant to importers is the daily restriction. As mentioned by authors Teresa M. Polino, Orisia K. Gammell and Julia L. Diaz in the Arent Fox LLP article Did You Know: The 2015 Trade Enforcement Act Can Save Importers Money?, “this increase applies to shipments of articles imported by one person (e.g., a company) on one day, other than in the case of articles sent as gifts from a person in foreign countries or in the case of articles accompanying and for the personal or household use of a person arriving in the U.S.”

 

As a result of this daily restriction, importers can only take advantage of the Section 321 benefit on one single transaction per day.

How to Declare Section 321

Goods valued at $800 USD or less can enter duty-free, without formal entry or eManifest into the U.S. Keep in mind that if entering with a shipment that does require an eManifest, the following steps will indicate to U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) that a Section 321 is on board.

  1. Within the ACE eManifest select the shipment type ‘section 321.’
  2. Enter a shipment control number for the goods
  3. Include goods details including shipper, consignee, value, commodity, and country of origin.
  4. Submit the eManifest to U.S.CBP

 

In addition, the carrier will need to provide the section 321 goods details and paperwork to the border officer upon request.

Since it is not a formal entry, there will be no entry number provided by U.S. CBP for section 321 shipments.

Best Practices

In conclusion, ensure that your carrier is not making multiple Section 321 claims. Carriers may elect to make the Section 321 claim to expedite the clearance process. However, they may be unaware of whether the importer reached their daily allowance or not. To avoid  penalties as a result of multiple transactions per day, we recommended that importers regulate shipment filings in the following ways:

  • Identify the particular shipment the Section 321 claim will be used each day
  • Request creation of formal entries on all other entries
  • Use the services of one customs broker to ensure filing of import/export transactions are consistent
  • Build strong communication lines with the logistics team including carriers, freight forwarders, and customs brokers

 

Have questions or comments regarding this provision and how you can ensure that you are taking advantage of Section 321 within the compliance guidelines? Ask us comments section below.

 

5 Most Common Mistakes to Avoid When Importing into the U.S.

Image: 5 Most Common Mistakes to Avoid When Importing into the U.S.

In 2010, during one of our first U.S. Customs Compliance seminars, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) identified the 5 most common mistakes to avoid when importing into the U.S., and interestingly enough, these are STILL the most common mistakes today.

Whether you are a U.S. manufacturer sourcing from China, purchasing completed goods for immediate sale, or acting as the non-resident importer (NRI) into the U.S., understanding these common mistakes and how to avoid them could save you a lot of time and money.

Mistake #1: Not Determining Your Customs Tariff Codes Correctly

The Harmonized Tariff Schedule determines the correct duty rate for your imported products. It is the foundation for your import compliance. Using the wrong code can mean you are underpaying or overpaying customs duties and taxes.

There are many ways to determine your customs tariff codes, some more reliable than others:

Regardless of your method of determination, treat tariff classification like you would a medical condition. Rather than relying on a self-diagnosis obtained from the internet, some things are best left to the trained professionals!

Mistake #2: Misunderstanding Rules of Origin

There are standard rules of origin for all goods. When importing goods into a nation with which the U.S. has a trade agreement, such as the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), they may be eligible for reduced or eliminated duty. Something to note, however, the use of an FTA may result in additional rules of origin to qualify for preferential treatment.

NAFTA certificates list the originating nation of the goods and act as proof of the claim. You, as the importer of record (IOR), are responsible for the completeness and accuracy of the NAFTA certificate.

Ensure you are filling out NAFTA certificates correctly by taking our Free Trade Agreements and Rules of Origin seminar or NAFTA for Beginners webinar series.

Mistake #3: Incorrect and Incomplete Country of Origin Marking

Legibly and permanently mark you imported goods with their country of origin. The country of origin may not be the same as country of purchase. Reference the U.S. Customs Regulation (19 CFR 134) to ensure compliance regarding markings and “J” list exemptions.

Pay close attention when reusing boxes. All previous markings must be eliminated to ensure that the correct country of origin markings are the only ones visible.

Mistake #4: Misunderstanding U.S. Customs Valuation

Delare the proper value of the imported goods to customs. Ensure you also calculate any deductions or additions. Support these adjustments with proper documentation at the time of entry.

Determine your goods value by attending our Customs Valuation seminar or commissioning our Trade Advisors.

Mistake #5: Using a U.S. Goods Returned Declaration for Non-American Goods

If you are importing goods back into the U.S., you can declare them as U.S. Goods Returned (USGR) to eliminate the duty… unless it turns out that they are not U.S. goods!

Declaration of Free Entry of Returned American Products requires you to provide appropriate documentation that goods were manufactured in the U.S. Maintaining a close relationship with your U.S. vendors may be helpful when it comes time to request an affidavit of manufacture to avoid paying duties on U.S.-made goods.

Final Suggestions by CBP

  1. If you are in doubt of whether or not your good is NAFTA eligible, do not claim it as such, and ensure that your customs broker does the same.
  2. If, after the fact, you find that you have made a mistake or a ‘false statement,’ notify CBP as soon as possible to ensure that you do not get penalized.
  3. Talk to your customs broker about the steps needed to disclose the scope of a discovered discrepancy. Some discrepancies can be corrected very quickly while others require more effort.

CBP does not want to be an impediment to doing business with the U.S. Avoid these 5 most common mistakes when importing into the U.S. and enjoy import success.

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