Posts Tagged ‘canada customs invoice’


 

6 Steps to Submitting Documentation to Your Customs Broker

There are many steps a carrier can take to ensure efficient entry into Canada prior to arrival. We have compiled 6 steps below.

Prior to Arrival

Step 1: Match loaded shipment to shipment paperwork

After loading, ensure that the documentation provided to you matches what was loaded on/in the trailer as well as what was transmitted to Canadian Border Services Agency (CBSA) via eManifest.  Ensure the cargo control number (CCN) or Pre-Arrival Review System (PARS) transmitted via eManifest matches what is provided to the customs broker.  Pay particular attention to commodity descriptions and piece counts. If the piece count or commodity differs, notify your dispatch. Do not send inaccurate documentation to the customs broker. This step helps to avoid inadvertently importing undeclared goods.

Step 2: Identify the customs broker for the shipment

Ensure you are aware of the customs broker in charge of submitting the entry to CBSA and obtain their current contact information. Once you have identified the customs broker, find their contact information by visiting their website. Submitting customs documentation to the incorrect broker or incorrect fax number or email address will result in the shipment not being accepted upon your initial request.

Step 3: Ensure you have all the paperwork needed to clear the shipment

Documentation includes the shipment invoice noting the commodities, piece count and weight actually loaded on the truck. Additional documentation can include phytosanitary certificates, certificates of origin and other documents that Other Government Departments (OGD) require in order to accept the load for entry into Canada. Please note however that in some cases, the carrier is only required to submit a bill of lading and PARS barcode with a reference number relating to paperwork previously submitted to the custom broker by the importing client. Missing information will result in processing delays with the customs broker.

Step 4: Prepare the documents for submission to the customs broker

  1. Place a bar-coded PARS sticker on each customs invoice. Ensure the PARS number matches what was transmitted via eManifest.  One PARS sticker can be used for each individual pickup and/or drop unless the load is from a consolidated warehouse. For more information on the difference between a consolidated and non-consolidated load please read our blog post entitled The No. 1 Contentious Issue with ACI eManifest – Consolidation.
  2. Under the PARS bar-code, write:
    1. The port in which you will be crossing into Canada.
    2. The estimated date and time of arrival (ETA) at the port of crossing with as much accuracy as possible.
  3. Include your name and contact information in case the broker needs to clarify or obtain additional information about the shipment.

Missing PARS bar-codes can result in Administrative Monetary Penalty System (AMPS) penalties, eManifest complications and/or delay in processing with the customs broker. Inaccurate ETA’s can backlog a customs broker and also delay processing time. Missing driver contact information inhibits the broker’s ability to contact the driver if there are any missing or illegible aspects of the documentation received.

Step 5: Submit the customs documentation in PDF format to the customs broker

Using the contact information obtained in step 2, carriers should submit all paperwork provided, including the information listed in step 4, to the customs broker. Often, attachments of word documents or picture files can be illegible to the customs broker. Therefore, ensuring the documentation is sent in PDF format can be the difference between expedited or delayed processing if the customs broker must contact the driver to request legible documentation. 

Please note: In addition to submitting customs documentation to the customs broker to obtain accepted entry status with CBSA, carriers are also responsible for reporting goods imported into Canada via ACI eManifest. Pacific Custom Brokers provides eManifest filing services for carriers. In those cases where Pacific Customs Brokers is both the customs broker for the shipment and the chosen eManifest service provider for the carrier, the carrier can include the ACI eManifest request sheet with their submission of customs documentation.

6. Check the acceptance status of the shipment

Ensure your shipment has received accepted status at least one hour prior to arriving at the port of crossing. At that time, if your shipment is not accepted for entry, you can work to rectify the issue prior to arriving at the port. Also ensure that the Cargo and Conveyance eManifest submission has received acceptance status.

Upon Arrival

On arrival at the border, present a machine readable bar-code to the Border Services Officer. This bar-code links the cargo data transmission to the information CBSA has in their system. The preferred option is a bar-coded Conveyance Reference Number (CRN) but a bar-coded Cargo Control Number (CCN) can be provided or both a bar-coded CRN and CCN. The CBSA officer will stamp the sheet with the bar-code as “proof of report”.

“Proof of release” can be obtained by obtaining a stamp on the PARS documents from the Border Services Officer at the time the cargo is released at first port of arrival or through  CBSA’s Release Notification System/RNS.

Are there additional steps you take to ensure efficient entry? Have questions or comments regarding the steps we have outlined? Leave them in our comments section below or email Ask Your Broker.

Canada Customs Invoice: 7 Mandatory Fields

Filling out a customs form A Canada Customs Invoice (CCI) is required for all shipments entering Canada that are valued over $2500.00 CAD. Do not take the risk of delaying your shipment at the border due to an incomplete or inaccurate Canada Customs Invoice (CCI).  Customs brokers see this happen often.

Mandatory Fields on a Canada Customs Invoice:

The following fields on a Canada Customs Invoice are mandatory for customs clearance, and must be provided at the time of release:

1. Date of Direct Shipment – This is the date the goods have left the place of direct shipment. This is used to obtain the exchange rate which will be used to convert the value for duty into Canadian dollars. Exchange rates vary day to day, which makes it very important to indicate the correct date of shipment on your invoice.

2. Country of Origin – This field must indicate the country where the products originated from or were manufactured. This will not necessarily be where the products were exported from. The country of origin will help determine if we can apply a trade agreement to lessen the duties applicable on the products being imported.

3. Currency of sale – This should indicate which funds were used to purchase the goods. This should never be left blank or assumed. Your customs broker must convert funds to Canadian dollars in order to file an entry with Canada Customs; this makes it very important to know which funds we are working with.

4. Quantity – This field should indicate the total number of pieces being shipped. If Customs examines a shipment, they will want to ensure that the number of pieces declared matches what is loaded on a truck. This makes it very important to ensure accuracy.

5. Value – This field should indicate the fair market value of the goods. This is required for all goods being imported – even if a sale has not occurred. Valuation of the items being imported should be based on one of the six valuation methods: transaction value of the goods, transaction value of identical goods, transaction value of similar goods, deductive method, computed method, or residual method.

6. Weight – This must indicate the weight of the goods. This should match up with the carrier’s bill of lading weight. This can also be used to verify accuracy in the case of a Customs examination.

7. Purchaser/Importer of Record – This field should indicate which party has purchased the goods. It will identify which party is responsible for handling the customs clearance, any duty, and accountable for any duty and taxes that are payable on the items being imported.

Snapshot - Sample Canada Customs Invoice

 

Here is an example of a properly completed Canada Customs Invoice. Click the link or the thumbnail image for a detailed view.

Sample Canada Customs Invoice Form

 

 

 

 

Interested in learning more about about documentation for importing into Canada? Pacific Customs Brokers hosts a series of Trade Compliance Seminars throughout the year. To learn more about this topic, we recommend attending an upcoming Canadian Customs Compliance Seminar.

Do you need additional assistance with your customs documentation, contact Pacific Customs Brokers.

Have questions on filling out a Canada Customs Invoice?  Ask us in our comments section below.

Video: Shipping to Canada & Tips for Avoiding Delays with Canada Customs Clearance

Accurately completed Canada Customs documentation will help your shipment reach its destination on time and reduce the risk of being held up by Canada Customs.

In this video you will learn:

  • What documents are required to ship to Canada
  • Information required on a Canada Customs Invoice
  • How to clear Customs in Canada
  • How to avoid delays at Canada Customs
  • Consequences of noncompliance with Canada Customs’ regulations

 

 

Do you have tips or questions on shipping to Canada? Drop us a comment or question below or email  Ask Your Broker.

 

Canada Customs Invoice: 7 Mandatory Fields

Filling out a customs formA Canada Customs Invoice (CCI) is required for all shipments entering Canada that are valued over $2500.00 CAD. Do not take the chance of delaying your shipment at the border due to an incomplete or inaccurate Canada Customs Invoice (CCI).  Customs brokers see this happen often.

Mandatory Fields on a Canada Customs Invoice:

The following fields on a Canada Customs Invoice are mandatory for customs clearance, and must be provided at the time of release:

1. Date of Direct Shipment – This is the date of the goods leaving the place of direct shipment. This is used to obtain the exchange rate which will be used to convert the value for duty into Canadian dollars. Exchange rates vary day to day, which makes it very important to indicate the correct date of shipment on your invoice.

2. Country of Origin – This field must indicate the country where the products originated from or were manufactured. This will not necessarily be where the products were exported from. The country of origin will help determine if we can apply a free trade agreement to avoid paying duties on the products being imported.

3. Currency of sale – This should indicate which funds were used to purchase the goods. This should never be left blank or assumed. Your customs broker must convert funds to Canadian dollars in order to file an entry with Canada Customs; this makes it very important to know which funds we are working with.

4. Quantity – This field should indicate the total number of pieces being shipped. If Customs examines a shipment, they will want to ensure that the number of pieces declared matches what is loaded on a truck. This makes it very important to ensure accuracy.

5. Value – This field should indicate the fair market value of the goods. This is required for all goods being imported – even if a sale has not occurred. Valuation of the items being imported should be based on one of the six valuation methods: transaction value of the goods, transaction value of identical goods, transaction value of similar goods, deductive method, computed method, or residual method.

6. Weight – This must indicate the weight of the goods. This should match up with the carrier’s bill of lading weight. This can also be used to verify accuracy in the case of a Customs examination.

7. Purchaser/Importer of Record – This field should indicate which party has purchased the goods. It will identify which party is responsible for handling the Customs Clearance, any duty, and taxes that are owing on the items being imported.

Snapshot - Sample Canada Customs Invoice

 

Here is an example of a properly completed Canada Customs Invoice. Click the link or the thumbnail image for a detailed view.

Sample Canada Customs Invoice Form

 

 

 

 

Interested in learning more about about documentation for importing into Canada? Pacific Customs Brokers hosts a series of Trade Compliance Seminars throughout the year. To learn more about this topic, we recommend attending an upcoming Canadian Customs Compliance Seminar.

Do you need additional assistance with your customs documentation, contact Pacific Customs Brokers.

Have questions on filling out a Canada Customs Invoice?  Ask us in our comments section below.

 

 

Full Appraisal Quality is a Mandatory CBSA Requirement

Electronic Data InterchangePacific Customs Brokers submits the majority of their shipments to Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) through an Electronic Data Interchange (EDI). The purpose of an EDI release is to provide customs brokers with the ability to transmit release and invoice data electronically, thereby removing the requirement to prepare and present hard copy release packages. To be compliant, Pacific Customs Brokers must ensure that we submit Full Appraisal Quality information to CBSA. This means we must transmit complete and accurate descriptions to Canada Customs as if we were taking a “snap shot” image of the physical invoice. Customs relies on our EDI details for both release decisions and post audit re-appraisals.

Lack of Full Appraisal Quality details on invoices can:

To avoid complications such as these requires a significant amount of co-ordination between the exporter, transporter, customs broker, and importer.

Full Appraisal Quality includes the following major aspects:

1. Complete Product Descriptions

The description of the goods should be in layman’s terms. Your customs broker has to know what they are classifying to Customs. The description should also include the material that the goods are made of (plastic, metal, etc.) A full appraisal description should look as follows:

“12x12 Glazed Ceramic Floor Tile”

2. Fair Market Value

Even if the shipper is giving you free samples, brochures, or whatever else the case may be, Customs requires that a value for the goods must be shown.

Please note: The term “fair market” means the value must be an accurate depiction of the goods being shipped, typically the Blue Book value of goods.

3. Quantities:

The amount of product must be put into a unit of measure, typically how the goods are sold. For example:  Per pound, package, piece, etc.

4. Ship Date:

Ship date refers to the date the goods began their journey to Canada. This is important since GST will be calculated according to this date.

5. Currency:

This is defining the currency that the goods were sold. For example: USD or CAD

6. Weight:

This is often computed on the bill of lading. It is acceptable to estimate the approximate weight of a shipment on the invoice.

 

*Remember: Full Appraisal Quality is not an option, it is the mandatory minimum information required by CBSA.

Snapshot - Canada Customs Invoice - Full Appraisal Quality

Here is an example of a properly completed Canada Customs Invoice that meets the requirements of Full Appraisal Quality. Click the link or the thumbnail image for a detailed view.

Canada Customs Invoice – Full Appraisal Quality. pdf

 

 

 

 

If you require further clarification, Pacific Customs Brokers would be happy to consult with you.

Do you have questions about Full Appraisal Quality, leave them in our comments section below or email Ask Your Broker.