Archive for the ‘Canada Customs’ Category


 

Canada Customs Invoice: 7 Mandatory Fields

Filling out a customs form A Canada Customs Invoice (CCI) is required for all shipments entering Canada that are valued over $2500.00 CAD. Do not take the risk of delaying your shipment at the border due to an incomplete or inaccurate Canada Customs Invoice (CCI).  Customs brokers see this happen often.

Mandatory Fields on a Canada Customs Invoice:

The following fields on a Canada Customs Invoice are mandatory for customs clearance, and must be provided at the time of release:

1. Date of Direct Shipment – This is the date the goods have left the place of direct shipment. This is used to obtain the exchange rate which will be used to convert the value for duty into Canadian dollars. Exchange rates vary day to day, which makes it very important to indicate the correct date of shipment on your invoice.

2. Country of Origin – This field must indicate the country where the products originated from or were manufactured. This will not necessarily be where the products were exported from. The country of origin will help determine if we can apply a trade agreement to lessen the duties applicable on the products being imported.

3. Currency of sale – This should indicate which funds were used to purchase the goods. This should never be left blank or assumed. Your customs broker must convert funds to Canadian dollars in order to file an entry with Canada Customs; this makes it very important to know which funds we are working with.

4. Quantity – This field should indicate the total number of pieces being shipped. If Customs examines a shipment, they will want to ensure that the number of pieces declared matches what is loaded on a truck. This makes it very important to ensure accuracy.

5. Value – This field should indicate the fair market value of the goods. This is required for all goods being imported – even if a sale has not occurred. Valuation of the items being imported should be based on one of the six valuation methods: transaction value of the goods, transaction value of identical goods, transaction value of similar goods, deductive method, computed method, or residual method.

6. Weight – This must indicate the weight of the goods. This should match up with the carrier’s bill of lading weight. This can also be used to verify accuracy in the case of a Customs examination.

7. Purchaser/Importer of Record – This field should indicate which party has purchased the goods. It will identify which party is responsible for handling the customs clearance, any duty, and accountable for any duty and taxes that are payable on the items being imported.

Snapshot - Sample Canada Customs Invoice

 

Here is an example of a properly completed Canada Customs Invoice. Click the link or the thumbnail image for a detailed view.

Sample Canada Customs Invoice Form

 

 

 

 

Interested in learning more about about documentation for importing into Canada? Pacific Customs Brokers hosts a series of Trade Compliance Seminars throughout the year. To learn more about this topic, we recommend attending an upcoming Canadian Customs Compliance Seminar.

Do you need additional assistance with your customs documentation, contact Pacific Customs Brokers.

Have questions on filling out a Canada Customs Invoice?  Ask us in our comments section below.

11 Reasons Why a Carrier Would Need to See a Customs Broker

Numbers-one-600A driver’s cross border journey is so much more than picking up freight and proceeding with delivery. Crossing international borders, especially with commercial freight, means complying with the rules of the governing country.

There are many aspects for the carrier to consider when planning their journey: transportation permits, routes, road conditions, hours and what customs requirements apply to the goods on board.

While most entries must be transmitted to the CBSA electronically for review, there are a number of exceptions to this rule. Here is a list of those exceptions to help give you a better understanding of some of the reasons you or your driver may have to stop your journey along the way:

  1. Invoice lines in excess of 999 lines — When an invoice covers a large number of purchased goods, it can take a customs broker quite some time to key it line by line. This is why customs has allowed entries exceeding 250 lines to be presented as a paper entry to help expedite the clearance process.
  2. Multiple Highway Cargo Control numbers at frontier
  3. Courier Low Value Shipment rejected from consist (2500CAD or less)
  4. Other government department permit or certificate required — There are certain goods that cannot be released electronically because they require a permit, certificate or license to be presented to CBSA. An example of this would be vehicles that require Form 1 or fire arms that require a special permit.
  5. System outage (ie. customs broker, CBSA or CFIA)
  6. Shortages, Entered to Arrive, Value Included — These goods are reported when the quantity of goods originally reported to the CBSA is different from that received by the importer or broker.
  7. Provisional — When the importer/owner or broker cannot establish a final value for duty of goods at the time of importation. In such cases, goods may be released under the interim accounting provisions.
  8. Prime & ETAs — When an item is too large to fit on one truck and transportation of the goods will be split up onto a number of trucks.
  9. Used self propelled vehicles — Goods that require U.S .customs authorization to export before they will be CBSA released.
  10. Used machinery requiring inspection — Goods that may have soil or dirt present must be inspected to ensure that the proper cleaning precautions have been taken.
  11. CBSA has requested to see a paper declaration

 

In any of the above cases, the customs broker will instruct you or your driver to come into their office to collect a paper package, which they will have prepared in advance. After obtaining instruction from the customs broker, you will proceed to the customs booth and advise the border service officer (BSO) that you need to see your customs broker. The border service officer will instruct you where to park while you take care of your documentation.

Once you’ve visited the customs broker and have obtained the paper package, those documents need to be presented to CBSA for their release decision. If release has been granted, Customs will stamp your paperwork released and you may then proceed with final delivery.

Do your due diligence and always ensure that your entries are good to go before proceeding to the border. By doing this, it gives you and the customs broker an opportunity to communicate any special instructions to each other.

What do you think? Leave us your questions or comments below or email Ask Your Broker.

A First Look At Importing Wooden Décor into Canada

wooden figurine

When importing goods that fall under tariff items 4420.10, 4420.90, 4421.90 or 9505.10 such as statuettes, other ornaments of wood and articles for Christmas festivities containing wooden components, the following information is required to ensure admissibility under Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) import requirements:

  • Thickness of wood  – Is it greater than, less than or equal to 1.5 cm thick?
  • Finish of the article – Is the article completely finished for example painted, lacquered, etc, or unfinished?
  • Wooden bark – Does the item contain bark?

It is strongly recommended that this information is clearly indicated on the invoice for each shipment prior to the documents being submitted to your customs brokers. If the required information is not provided then affected importers will be contacted however, this can potentially result in delays in customs clearance.

Goods classified under these headings that are less than 1.5 cm thick will most likely be approved for import with no additional document requirements.

Goods classified under these headings that are greater 1.5 cm thick, depending on your origin, could require any or all of the following:

  • Plant Protection Import Permit
  • Phytosanitary Certificate
  • Phytosanitary Certificate for Re-export

Recently, we have encountered several transactions containing decorative wood products where the invoice description did not provide on the thickness, whether it was a is completely finished article or if it contained bark. After the goods were released the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) contacted the importer to perform an inspection on the shipment. Many products were found to exceed 1.5 cm thickness and were of foreign origin. This resulted in a Phytosanitary Certificate for Re-export being required.  As this was not prepared at the time of export, the supplier was not able to produce the required documents. Therefore the CFIA forced the importer to destroy the goods in question at the importers expense.

Should you need more information, please contact your local CFIA office at: Area and Regional Offices

 

ACI eManifest: Updated Timelines for System Functionality and Deployment

Update ArrowCanada Border Services Agency has provided updated timelines for ACI eManifest system functionality and deployment. These timelines and dates, which could be subject to change, are available in this CBSA presentation.

It is important to note that this presentation does not address the question that is uppermost in carriers’ minds – when will eManifest  become mandatory? Most of these updates deal with technical issues. Carriers that utilize a service provider or file their ACI eManifests using the Canada Border Services Agency web portal will be largely unaffected.

Highlights of this presentation include:

  • Implementation of Integrated Import Declaration (IID) and Document Imaging Function (DIF) in early 2015, with a February target
  • Introduction of a subset of new eManifest notices, for all EDI commercial clients, that will advise on the completeness of advance data submitted to the CBSA and on the arrival and release of shipments in December 2015
  • Deployment of electronic systems (EDI and eManifest Portal) for importers to transmit advance trade data (ATD) in December 2016

The Canadian Society of Customs Brokers’ visual timeline of CBSA/PGA initiatives also reflects these changes.

If you have any questions about ACI eManifest, or any other cross-border transportation matters, please do not hesitate to contact our Carrier Relations Liaison at 855.542.6644  or via email at carrierhelpdesk@pcb.ca.

For the latest updates on eManifest visit the Carrier News section of our website regularly or sign up for our weekly Border Pro newsletter. Additionally, you’ll find the Your Broker Knows YouTube channel to be an excellent resource.

 

Additional Resources:

Shipping Holiday Gifts into Canada – A Word to the Wise

Shipping Holiday Gifts into CanadaWith the holiday season upon us, many businesses and individuals send and receive gifts that cross borders. Whether you are sending corporate gifts to clients and vendors, online shopping or receiving gifts by mail from family and friends, you should be aware of a few details with regards to holiday gifts and cross-border shipping.

A. Sending holidays gifts from a business to a business

1. Don’t let customs clearance catch your recipient by surprise.

When sending a business gift, the receiver of the gift should not have to be responsible for customs clearance charges. Especially since they will not have the required information of the item being gifted in order to complete the customs entry. Arrange for customs clearance through your customs broker. Even though these are free, non-solicited gifts, they will require clearing customs and payment of all applicable duties and taxes.

Customs clearance requirements:

The gift will need to be accompanied by a pro-forma invoice, including all of the same required information as a commercial import. You must also declare an accurate commercial value for the product, as the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) does not accept inaccurate valuation.

2. Alcohol and spirits can be more expensive when shipping internationally.

Importing alcohol into Canada is subject to high duty and excise tax rates, and the import must be routed through a board, commission, officer, or governmental agency legally authorized to sell intoxicating liquor. If gifting liquor is a must, try contacting a winery or liquor store in the Canadian domestic market to purchase from and ship on your behalf.

3. Select the right gift basket.

If purchasing prepackaged gift baskets, be aware of its contents. Certain items such as meats, cheeses, fish and plant products require additional certificates, licenses, permits, and often carry high levels of applicable duties, making it extremely difficult to process such small quantities of these items contained in these gifts. We suggest giving gift baskets made up of items such as cookies, chocolates, coffee, crackers, oils, candles, etc., and avoid anything made from animal or animal products.

 

The bottom line:

If your organization is sending gifts cross-border, be prepared to treat them like every other export that is moved across international borders.

B. Shopping for holiday gifts online.

Many shoppers are choosing to stay away from the crowds, and are turning to online shopping these days. Be aware that the vast majority of online purchases are shipped from a non-domestic market (international) and will be required to clear through customs.

Check the online store’s or seller’s terms of sale and delivery

Confirm who is required to pay for the customs clearance – the seller or purchaser. If the purchaser is responsible for the customs clearance you will need to be prepared to pay all applicable duties and taxes when the item moves across the border. If the shipment is sent by mail and valued under $60.00 CAD, then there is the potential for the Canadian Border Service Agency (CBSA) to allow the shipment to enter Canada without duties and taxes being paid.

Customs clearance requirements:

Although it will be a personal, non-commercial entry, in order to process the import you will be required to provide an invoice, including country of origin of the product, currency, and a complete description of the product(s) being shipped.

 

C. Mailing personal gifts to family and friends.

If you have friends or relatives who live abroad and are mailing you gifts, please ensure that they properly qualify the item as a gift and include a customs declaration.

Here are some things to keep in mind:

  • For an item to qualify as a “gift”, a friend or relative must send it to you personally and include a card or other notice indicating that it is a gift.
  • If you receive an imported gift by mail that is worth $60 CAD or less, you will not have to pay duty or tax on it.
  • If the gift is worth more than $60 CAD, you will have to pay any applicable duties and taxes on any amount over $60 CAD. For example: If a relative sends you a gift worth $200 CAD, you will pay any applicable duty, GST or HST and PST on $140 CAD.

Certain items do not qualify for the $60CAD gift exemption and are listed below:

  • tobacco
  • alcoholic beverages
  • advertising material
  • items sent by a business

Please also note that the $60 CAD gift exemption cannot be combined with the $20 CAD exemption that is available on most items valued at $20 CAD or less.

*These guidelines are applicable all year round, and are not specific to the holiday season.

 

Need assistance with shipping your holiday gifts into Canada this season? Pacific Customs Brokers can help. Contact our Client Services team for questions or a quote.

 

Will you be shipping Christmas gifts cross-border this year? Have questions? Leave them in our comments section below.